PCB Prototype

Rapid PCB Prototype Service

Tag: asterisk (page 2 of 3)

videollamadas asterisk



Usando una raspberry pi y dos softphone Bria en un iPad e iPhone se pueden realizar video llamadas.

source

Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

With regard to this week’s Top Five, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five programming languages for DevOps.

5 Best article content of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is best for web development?
3. How to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build up your own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How you can set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the 1st officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, along with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published a month later, and ever since then I have been playing around with the many various Fedora spins accessible for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a range of hints, screenshots, as well as my own personal ideas on the first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Tutorial 60: Using Raspbx as GSM gateway



This video will show you how to set Raspbx as GSM/UMTS gateway.
It is simple to understand like the other BeAble video tutorials.
All our videos are part of BeApp project (http://www.beable.it).
stay tuned!

source

5 Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

In this week’s Top Five, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

5 Best articles of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is perfect for website development?
3. Find out how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Ways to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Please read on about the very first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in conjunction with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released four weeks later, and since then I have been experimenting with the several different Fedora spins readily available for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a collection of recommendations, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Asterisk on Raspberry pi with dialpan Basic Tutorial



thanks for watching … if u want little learn about video

visit my blog
learnbybit.blogspot.com

enjoy 🙂 🙂

source

Five Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

With regard to this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial article content of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is perfect for website design?
3. Learn how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read on about the first formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in conjunction with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched one month later, and since then I have been experimenting with the a lot of Fedora spins available for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of tricks, screenshots, as well as my personal thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI tftp DHCP server Debian Raspbian CISCO tutorial fix



Weekend project – #Linux video tutorial 🙂 #RasPI #RaspberryPI #Raspberry #Debian #Wembin #tftp #Jessie #Raspbian #Asterisk #freePBX #DHCP #Tutorial
INSTALL WEBMIN: go for latest version and instructions http://www.webmin.com/deb.html and copy and paste install codes. You might want to use sudo if you’re not root.
——————————————————————
From Webmin click to install DHCP server
——————————————————————
INSTALL TFTP SERVER
sudo apt-get install tftpd-hpa
edit settings using command:
sudo nano /etc/default/tftpd-hpa
Make sure your file looks like this:
TFTP_USERNAME=”tftp”
TFTP_DIRECTORY=”/tftpboot”
TFTP_ADDRESS=”0.0.0.0:69″
TFTP_OPTIONS=”-4 –create –secure”
——————————————————————
Upload phone loads to /tftpboot
——————————————————————
chmod 777 or 755 depends of the installation and you’re done.

source

5 Most Beneficial: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

With regard to this week’s Top 5, we spotlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your special DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five development languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial content of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be best for web design?
3. Ways to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Create your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best ways to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Continue reading about the first formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, along with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was introduced 1 month later, and subsequently I have been playing around with the various Fedora spins for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a collection of tricks, screenshots, along with my own individual thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI as an Asterisk Server



Short video demo using Skype to call a DID number abroad and routing the call to my old Nokia E51 phone.

Article found here: http://www.ostalks.com/2013/06/09/raspberry-pi-and-multiple-gsm-modems/

source

5 Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

On the subject of this week’s Top 5, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for website development, and the top 5 programming languages for DevOps.

Top 5 posts of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is most suitable for website development?
3. Find out how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Ways to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the 1st officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, along with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched 4 weeks later, and since that time I have been experimenting with the many different Fedora spins intended for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This post is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a variety of tips, screenshots, and my own personal thoughts on the first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Home VOIP System using Asterisk PBX



I have just converted my Starhub Singapore land-line phone into an VOIP system using Asterisk PBX. Using this configuration, I can make an outgoing and incoming call using the Softphone installed on my IPad.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

In this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

5 Top content articles of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is the best for web design?
3. The best way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Find out how to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Maintain reading about the first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, along with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the all sorts of Fedora spins readily available for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a number of advice, screenshots, and my own individual ideas on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

APRS and Garmin 350, Torque OBD2, Broadband Hamnet, Raspberry Pi Asterisk



My Crown Victoria outfitted with Kenwood TM-D710 APRS radio, fed by Garmin 350 GPS and a Android Tablet running Torque feeding off scantool.net OBD2 bluetooth. Broadband Hamnet mesh network and Raspberrry Pi Asterisk phone system, in my Ford Crown Victoria.

The Pi – Asterisk system is used for emergency communications. When my car shows up with the mesh node and the server, all the SIP phones on other mesh nodes begin to work. Voice mail, conf calling, call waiting, etc. (Fun? Yes!)

source

Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

When considering this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, contrasting Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Best content articles of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be perfect for web development?
3. Find out how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build up your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How one can install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Keep reading about the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, together with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched a month later, and subsequently I have been playing around with the an assortment of Fedora spins accessible for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of suggestions, screenshots, and my own individual thoughts on the first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

ระบบIP Video Phone ด้วย Asterisk บน Raspberry Pi



ใช้ Image จาก http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/ แล้วก็เพิ่ม videosupport=yes ในไฟล์ sip_general_custom.conf และในคอนฟิกตรง extension ให้ Allowed Codecs h264 ด้วยครับ ให้ใส่รวมกับ Codecs ของเสียงไปเลย เช่น ulaw&alaw&h264

ขออภัยที่ทำลวกๆ ขอบคุณที่รับชมครับ
https://www.mnc.co.th , https://store.mnc.co.th

source

5 Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

On the subject of this week’s Top Five, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, evaluating Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial posts of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is best for web design?
3. Tips on how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your very own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The right way to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in addition to initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published one month later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the all sorts of Fedora spins readily available for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a number of advice, screenshots, and also my own personal thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Portero IP(SIP) Raspberry Pi & Asterisk



Emulando un Portero IP con la Raspberry PI y Asterisk

source

5 Most Beneficial: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

When considering this week’s Top 5, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, contrasting Python and Ruby for website development, and the top 5 coding languages for DevOps.

5 Top articles of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be the best for website development?
3. The best way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Easy methods to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Maintain reading about the first officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in conjunction with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and after that I have been playing around with the a number of Fedora spins readily available for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a assortment of recommendations, screenshots, as well as my personal thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Older posts Newer posts

© 2019 PCB Prototype

Up ↑