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How to Install Raspbian from Ubuntu for Raspberry Pi



How to install Raspbian to an SD Card for creating a usable Raspberry Pi from Ubuntu 12.04.
No need to buy a pre-imaged SD card as it only takes a few minutes to write Raspbian to the card.

Raspbian is based on Debian Wheezy, and has been optimised for use on an ARM device. Many of the packages have been compiled in an ARM compatible format, it comes with LXDE desktop pre-installed, and the Terminal commands are very similar to Ubuntu, which makes this distro easy to use.

The included configuration app, raspi-config, allows you to expand the size of the partitioning, change keyboard config, and set whether LXDE should load at boot time.

sudo dd bs=4M if=x.img of=dev/sdx

Website: http://www.raspbian.org/
Download: http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads
Wallpaper: http://imgur.com/g7jF3

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: Why They’re a Better Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest small computer on the planet, and it is what its challengers are looking to explain to the rest of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is released on the market promising to be the largest one to defeat Raspberry Pi. In truth, there is a new Raspberry Pi killer known as NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and costs you $30.

The Raspberry Pi is released with four versions in the past. They include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most current which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was designed to confirm that Raspberry Pi will please anybody with a low priced computer for coding. It’s enhanced Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday mentioned, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Priced at $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most popular of all.

The Raspberry Pi, then again, is not the merely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a number more available which cost less, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a bit more, ZD Net announced.

First off, there is the Omega 2, having a modular nature encouraging coders to add in Bluetooth or Navigation systems comfortably. It has internal Wi-Fi and flash storage; the OS is Linux distribution founded on the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 will cost you $5 and can also operate on FreeBSD OS, which describes why it is really great for college students.

The BBC Micro:bit will cost you $16 and is excellent for students for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor chip powers it internally and it shines from the remaining simply because of its 5×5 LED matrix. This function provides 25 separately programmable red Led lights for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which will cost you $55 and like the Raspberry Pi, is also a community-supported platform both for hobbyists and designers. It truely does work quickly; it can boost Linux in around Ten seconds and can develop in under Five minutes. It’s pushed by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 and 512MB DDR3 RAM.

A fresh one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that was referred to as as the most current Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a more robust layout and design and was able to merge important functions for example , Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Also, it presents an IR receiver, mic, 8GB storage, and power and reset switches.

Yet, the most desirable function of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and Debian, Beta News revealed. It’s an excellent option for company users, programmers, enthusiasts, and students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec rolls out Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Learn more on official webpage: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There is a new Raspberry Pi challenger that is quite budget friendly. In truth, a number of people might see it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an certainly remarkable layout and design, and key integrated features similar to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry Pi Zero, headless wifi setup – Part 1



In this tutorial I take you through setting up a Raspberry Pi Zero headless using a Ryanteck Debug clip without a monitor, keyboard or mouse.

I setup a wifi dongle and then gain access to the Pi via SSH
I talk you though the settings in the /etc/network/interfaces file to get the Pi onto your local wifi network

Contents of my /etc/network/interfaces file is as follows:

# interfaces(5) file used by ifup(8) and ifdown(8)

# Please note that this file is written to be used with dhcpcd For
# static IP, consult /etc/dhcpcd.conf and ‘man dhcpcd.conf’

# Include files from /etc/network/interfaces.d:
source-directory /etc/network/interfaces.d

auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

iface eth0 inet manual

allow-hotplug wlan0
auto wlan0
iface wlan0 inet dhcp
# wpa-conf /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf
wpa-ssid your-ssid
wpa-psk your-wifi-password

allow-hotplug wlan1
iface wlan1 inet manual
wpa-conf /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf
#—– end of file

Ryanteck debug clip can be purchased from here:
https://ryanteck.uk/raspberry-pi/59-raspberry-pi-debug-clip-0635648607184.html

source

Raspberry Pi Substitutes: Exactly Why They’re a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest micro PC in the market, and it is what its contenders are wanting to convey to the remainder of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is released out there promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. Truthfully, you will find there’s new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and charges $30.

The Raspberry Pi is launched with four variants as time passes. These comprise of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the newest which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 is built to make sure Raspberry Pi has the potential to delight anybody with a low cost PC for programming. It has upgraded CPU with the Cortex A53, Hackaday described, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Priced at $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most well-known of all.

The Raspberry Pi, however, is not the solely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are many more available which are cheaper, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little bit more, ZD Net announced.

First off, there’s the Omega 2, along with a modular nature granting computer programmers to include Bluetooth or Navigation systems easily. It has in-built Wi-Fi and flash storage space; the OS is Linux distro on top of the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 costs $5 and can also operate on FreeBSD OS, which explains why it is really excellent for learners.

The BBC Micro:bit costs $16 and is perfect for learners for their training and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex cpu energizes it internally and it is different from the others due to the 5×5 LED matrix. This function delivers 25 independently programmable red-colored Led lights for basic output.

In addition, there is the BeagleBone Black, which costs $55 and exactly like the Raspberry Pi, is additionally a community-supported platform both for enthusiasts and builders. It truely does work fast; it can certainly boost Linux in merely 10-seconds and can develop in less than Five min’s. It is powered by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 as well as 512MB DDR3 RAM.

One more is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which has been dubbed as the new Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a better made layout and design and was able to assimilate crucial attributes for example Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. Additionally, it includes an Infrared receiver, mic, 8GB storage, and power and reset control buttons.

Yet, the most desirable function of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and Debian, Beta News stated. It is well suited for venture users, developers, hobbyists, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Get more information on official web site: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You will find a new Raspberry Pi rival that is quite cheap. For that matter, some individuals may view it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably superior layout and design, and additionally critical included features such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

https://www.betanews.com/2017/03/02/friendlyelec-linux-debian-ubuntu-nanopi-m1-plus-raspberry-pi/

Raspberry PI 2, GPIO, SPI, I2C and OneWire Setup



In this post of the Raspberry PI series we look at what is required to setup a Raspberry PI 2 after the initial Raspbian setup. It assumes you have completed “sudo atp-get update” and “sudo apt-get upgrade” or that you install is up to date and you can SSH into the PI from a console using TeraTerm or Putty (Or your own favourite SSH) app.

The process shows how to install and test all the various libraries we will need for the up coming tutorials on adding devices to the PI2 GPIO connector including I2C chips like ADCs and DACs, SPI devices like the 16bit port expander “23S17” from microchip and many others.

Just so you don’t feel like its all install and no practical, In this video I also show how to connect and use a simple one wire device, the DS18B21 from Maxim : http://datasheets.maximintegrated.com/en/ds/DS1821.pdf

One of the libraries we will install is wiringpi by Gordon Henderson : http://wiringpi.com/ a great set of libraries with support for an ever growing set of devices and allowing you to program in C but with the feel that you may be used to with an Arduino. More on this in future episodes

Another source of inspiration is the Adafruit tutorial series, they have done a great job creating these and you should go have a look: Learn @ Adafruit and for the temp sensor, adafruits raspberry-pi lesson 11 ds18b20 temperature sensing

At time of posting I have already filmed the next instalment where I will show you how to control an ADC (ADS1115 – quad 16bit from TI), and two DACs (DAC8574 – quad 16bit, DAC8571 – Single 16bit) it will be posted as soon as I’m done editing it

This preparation will flow into my Power supply project down the road as an example of how to integrate a reasonably powerful controller to the Analogue power system.

An added component in the design will also be a barrier I2C device to provide isolation between the PI and the Power side. Stay tuned

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Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: How Come They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest tiny PC in the market, and it is what its contenders are attempting to notify the remainder of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is launched out there promising to be the biggest one to take down Raspberry Pi. To put it accurately, there’s a new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and costs $30.

The Raspberry Pi is introduced with 4 variations as time goes by. These consist of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most up-to-date which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 is built to make sure that Raspberry Pi could gratify anybody with a low-cost PC for developer work. It has replaced CPU with the Cortex A53, Hackaday suggested, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most widely used of all.

The Raspberry Pi, on the other hand, is not the single single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a number more for sale that entails lower cost, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net declared.

To start with, there is the Omega 2, that includes a modular nature granting developers to attach Wireless bluetooth or Global positioning system unit comfortably. It has in-built Wi-Fi and flash storage space; the Operating-system is Linux distro based upon the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 will cost you $5 and can easily operate on FreeBSD Operating system, which describes why it really is best for students.

The BBC Micro:bit will cost you $16 and is excellent for school students for their exercising and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex cpu energizes it from inside and it excels from the competition because of its 5×5 LED matrix. This function gives you 25 separately programmable red Led lights for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which will cost you $55 and like the Raspberry Pi, is additionally a community-supported platform both for enthusiasts and builders. It truely does work quick; it can boost Linux in lower than 10 seconds and can develop in less than 5 minutes. It’s powered by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 and 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Someone else is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which was named as the most recent Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a more robust design and layout and was competent to combine key options like Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. In addition, it consists of an Infrared receiver, mic, 8GB memory space, and power and reset control buttons.

Yet, the best feature of NanoPi M1 Plus is its power to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, as well as Debian, Beta News suggested. It’s excellent for business users, coders, fans, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec roll-outs Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Learn more on official webpage: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There is a new Raspberry Pi rival that is quite economical. Believe it or not, some folks might regard it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably remarkable design and layout, plus important incorporated features just like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Phone Calling on a Raspberry Pi



Answer and make calls right from your Raspberry Pi. Here’s how to get going by making and receiving phone calls.

source

Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

With regard to this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 pieces of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is perfect for website design?
3. How one can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your very own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Methods to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the first formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, together with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released one month later, and after that I have been playing around with the many Fedora spins obtainable for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a variety of hints, screenshots, and also my own individual thoughts on the very first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B Overview & Setup | RS Components



http://uk.rs-online.com/web/generalDisplay.html?id=raspberrypi

Learn how to get started with your Raspberry Pi3 model. The New Raspberry Pi comes with a Broadcom BCM2387 chipset and has a 64Bit, 1.2GHz Quad-Core ARM Cortex-A53 802.11 b/g/n Wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.1 (Bluetooth Classic and BLE).
You can see how to connect all your interfaces and update and download the latest operating system onto your NOOBS.

Watch a comparison of Raspberry Pi 2 Model B and the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B here: the https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45Mls8BCgtE

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Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: The Reason They’re a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest mini computer internationally, and it is what its challengers are attempting to say to the rest of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is launched out there promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. In fact, there exists a new Raspberry Pi killer referred to as NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and priced at $30.

The Raspberry Pi is introduced with four variants over the years. They include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recently released which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was designed to make certain Raspberry Pi is able to please a person with a low cost computer for coding. It’s replaced Processor with the Cortex A53, Hackaday announced, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Costing $35, the Raspberry Pi is the best of all.

The Raspberry Pi, having said that, isn’t the sole single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are plenty more available which be cheaper, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net announced.

For starters, there’s the Omega 2, that features a modular nature making it possible for developers to increase Bluetooth or Gps navigation comfortably. It has constructed in Wi-Fi and flash memory; the Operating system is Linux distribution based upon the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 costs you $5 and can easily run on FreeBSD Operating system, which explains why it is really useful for school students.

The BBC Micro:bit costs you $16 and is good for school students for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor powers it from the inside and it sticks out from the others simply because of its 5×5 LED matrix. This attribute presents 25 singularly programmable red-colored Led lights for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which costs you $55 and like the Raspberry Pi, is one more community-supported platform both for amateurs and programmers. It functions speedy; it could boost Linux in less than 10 seconds and can develop in within 5 min’s. It is actually driven by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 combined with 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Yet another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which has been referred to as as the new Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a better made layout and design and was capable to assimilate vital functions similar to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. It also consists of an IR receiver, mic, 8GB storage space, and power and reset control buttons.

However, the finest element of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capacity to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, as well as Debian, Beta News published. It’s useful for company users, developers, hobbyists, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Uncover more on official website: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There is a new Raspberry Pi contender that is quite low-priced. To put it accurately, some people might view it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably top-quality layout and design, and essential built-in features including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

How to Install OpenCV On Raspberry Pi



Update on libraries:
———————————-
I have just installed the new Jessie distribution with OpenCV 3.0 and I had to update couple of libraries.
libtiff4 should be libtiff5 and the second big install list is this:

sudo apt-get -y install build-essential cmake cmake-curses-gui pkg-config libpng12-0 libpng12-dev libpng++-dev libpng3 libpnglite-dev zlib1g-dbg zlib1g zlib1g-dev pngtools libtiff5-dev libtiff5 libtiffxx0c2 libtiff-tools libeigen3-dev
Also, if you are looking for a package for Jessie here is a nice link that lists all the packages:
https://www.howtoinstall.co/en/debian/jessie/main/

With this video tutorial I will show how to Install OpenCV on the Raspberry Pi Model B with the Raspbian distribution. In the end there is a short demo on how to connect with the camera.

Configuration setup and walkthrough can be found on my web site:
www.robopapa.com (or if you want to get directly to the page you can go here http://www.robopapa.com/Projects/InstallOpenCVOnRaspberryPi

I also created an OpenCV Tracking video which you can watch it here:

And don’t forget to subscribe (It really helps!!)
https://www.youtube.com/user/therobopapa?sub_confirmation=1

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: Reasons Why They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest tiny computer on the planet, and it is what its rivals are attempting to convey to the rest of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is launched in the marketplace promising to be the biggest one to take down Raspberry Pi. In fact, there’s a new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and costs $30.

The Raspberry Pi is launched with four variations over the years. These consist of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recent which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was created to be sure that Raspberry Pi has the potential to please anyone with an affordable computer for computer programming. It’s improved Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday announced, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most favored of all.

The Raspberry Pi, however, isn’t the sole single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are lots more available in the market that are less costly, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for some extra, ZD Net announced.

First off, there is the Omega 2, along with a modular nature allowing for computer programmers to bring in Bluetooth or Global positioning systems with no trouble. It has inbuilt Wi-Fi and flash storage area; the Operating-system is Linux distro derived from the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 costs you $5 and can even operate on FreeBSD OS, which describe why it’s appropriate for people in the course.

The BBC Micro:bit costs you $16 and is perfect for learners for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor energizes it from inside and it stands apart from the remainder because of its 5×5 LED matrix. This benefit gives you 25 separately programmable red-colored LEDs for basic output.

There’s also the BeagleBone Black, which costs you $55 and like the Raspberry Pi, is one more community-supported platform both for hobbyists and programmers. It truly does work quickly; it can boost Linux in less than Ten secs and can develop in below 5 min’s. It is actually motorized by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 combined with 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Someone else is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which was known as as the new Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a better quality design and layout and was in a position to include crucial features similar to Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. In addition, it provides an IR receiver, microphone, 8GB storage, and power and reset buttons.

On the other hand, the most excellent attribute of NanoPi M1 Plus is its ability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and also Debian, Beta News explained. It’s just the thing for business users, programmers, enthusiasts, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec rolls out Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Learn more on official site: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There’s a new Raspberry Pi contender that is quite low-priced. In truth, some folks might see it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably top-quality design and layout, as well as key in-built features like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry Pi 3 Super Computing Cluster Part 1 – Hardware List and Assembly



Part 2 – Software Configuration is now live! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZ5uX-JJbyY

In celebration of crossing my 1,000,000th Einstein@Home Credit, I’m sharing how I built my Raspberry Pi 3 Cluster. Feel free to contact me with any questions.

B+ Mounting Hole Template:
http://www.raspberrypi-spy.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Raspberry-Pi-Mounting-Hole-Template.pdf

Parts List

Raspberry Pi 3 x 8
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/83-17300

Samsung EVO 16gb Micro SD Card x 8
http://www.microcenter.com/product/431733/16GB_microSD_Class_10_-_UHS-1_Flash_Memory_Card_with_Adapter

Raspberry Pi Heat Sink Kits x 4
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B018GBPCUC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

1′ Anker Powerline Micro USB Cables x 8
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B015XR60MQ/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

100 Nylon Standoffs 10mm/6mm Male
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NQB8YU8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

TrendNet TE100-S8 10/100 Switch
https://www.amazon.com/TRENDnet-Unmanaged-GREENnet-Ethernet-TE100-S8/dp/B000M2UZBK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1470096082&sr=8-1&keywords=trendnet+te100-s8

USB to Type M Adapter Cable
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003MQO96U/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

1.5′ Cat 5 Cables x 3
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00K5A5F00/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

1′ Cat 5 Cables x 5
https://www.amazon.com/iMBAPrice-Cat5e-Network-Ethernet-IMBA-CAT5-01BK-10PK/dp/B00HNV8ND0/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1470096188&sr=1-1&keywords=1%27+cat5

10 Port USB Power Supply 60W or more
https://www.amazon.com/Anker-10-Port-Charger-Multi-Port-PowerPort/dp/B00YRYS4T4/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1470096251&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=10+port+usb+charger&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/Sabrent-Family-Sized-Charger-Technology-AX-TPCS-W/dp/B019GB57R4/ref=sr_1_5?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1470096251&sr=1-5&keywords=10+port+usb+charger
https://www.amazon.com/ORICO-Charging-Station-Samsung-Motorola/dp/B00LN37VGY/ref=sr_1_32?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1470096289&sr=1-32&keywords=10+port+usb+charger

AC Infinity Dual 80mm USB Cooling Fans
https://www.amazon.com/AC-Infinity-MULTIFAN-Receiver-Playstation/dp/B00IJ2J2K0/ref=sr_1_2?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1470096385&sr=1-2&keywords=ac+infinity+80mm

Einstein@Home: https://https://einsteinathome.org
My Performance: https://www.einsteinathome.org/show_user.php?userid=750042 source

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) aims to gadgets

Sort of announced in July 2016, the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) is assumed to hit the market quickly. Last Oct computer equipment company NEC previously announced a new spread of professional P and V Series large format displays that seamlessly embed the RPi CM3 module. The new module, available in two flavors – CM3 and CM3L (lite) – will complement the CM1 module launched before.

Specs for the CM1, CM3 and CM3L SODIMM modules appear in the data sheet offered on the RPi website
https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/computemodule/RPI-CM-DATASHEET-V1_0.pdf
. Where the CM1 was driven by a BCM2835 processor chip (as utilized on the original RPi and RPi B+ models), the CM3 contains a quad-core 1.2 GHz BCM2837 chip, like the RPi 3. It provides 1 Gigabyte of LPDDR2 RAM and 4 Gigabyte eMMC Flash. The ‘L’ version is a CM3 not having eMMC Flash, permitting the customer to link up his/her individual SD/eMMC device. The pinout of the CM1 and CM3 modules are exactly the same but the CM3 module is one mm higher (31 millimeters).

Price

The buying price of the new modules isn’t known yet, but because a CM1 is sold at roughly £20, a similar price could possibly be expected for the CM3.

Based upon : https://www.elektormagazine.com/news/raspberry-pi-compute-module-3-cm3-to-hit-the-market-soon

Specs

The CM3 is based on the Raspberry Pi 3 hardware and is created for industrial use in order to supply a cost efficient opportunity for people to make customized products based on the Pi software and hardware system. The Compute Module series is scaled-down and has less functions and ports than a regular Raspberry Pi, so that it is suited to Internet of Things (IoT) products.

“The module uses a standard DDR2 SODIMM form factor, sockets for which are made by a few makers, are conveniently available in the market, and also are cost-effective,” Raspberry Pi COO and hardware lead James Adams explained in a post.

There are 2 versions of the CM3. Listed below are the specifications for both of them:

Standard Version:

BCM2837 processor at to a maximum of 1.2GHz
1Gigabyte RAM
4Gigabyte of on-module eMMC flash

Lite Version:

BCM2837 processor at to a maximum of 1.2GHz
1GB RAM
SD card interface on Module pins for that reason an end user can wire it up to an eMMC or SD card of their choice

Both models can be slotted into a newly released Compute Module IO Board V3 (CMIO3) which lets you conduct the following:

Presents necessary power to the CM3
Permits you to program the CM3 Standard’s flash memory or to work with an SD card on the Lite version.
Connect to the processor interfaces in a slightly more friendly fashion (pin headers and flexi connectors, just like the Pi)
Offers the essential HDMI and USB connectors allowing you to have an entire system which can boot Raspbian (or perhaps the OS of your choosing).

“This board presents both a starting template for those who want to design with the Compute Module, and a fast way to get started on trying out the hardware, and building and testing a system, before you go to the expense of making a made to order board,” Adam said.

The older Compute Module model will still be offered, for individuals that wouldn’t like the CM3’s performance boost. As reported by the Raspberry Pi official mag The MagPi:

“With a couple of caveats, the CM3 can be utilized a drop-in replacement for the CM1 considering they are pin compatible; the CM3 is 1mm taller, on the other hand, while the CPU can pull a lot more current from the VBAT power source line and will eventually deliver a great deal more heat under heavy load.”

Raspberry Pi [10] – Connecting Camera Module



Camera Module for Raspberry Pi was launched quite a while back but I have recently got it from element14. It has a 5MP sensor and is capable of clicking 1080p videos @30fps and 720p videos @60fps. But here’s the catch. The setup may seem a bit complicated in the beginning but it is damn simple.

Article – http://www.techiesparks.com/2014/06/17/connecting-camera-module-rpi/873

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Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) aims to consumer products

Sort of announced in July 2016, the recent Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) is known to arrive at the market soon. Last October computer system equipment producer NEC already announced a new range of professional P and V Series large format displays that easily implant the RPi CM3 module. The new module, obtainable in two flavors – CM3 and CM3L (lite) – will complement the CM1 module launched before.

Specs for the CM1, CM3 and CM3L SODIMM modules are available in the data sheet offered on the RPi internet site
https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/computemodule/RPI-CM-DATASHEET-V1_0.pdf
. Where the CM1 was powered by a BCM2835 CPU (as used on the original RPi and RPi B+ models), the CM3 provides a quad-core 1.2 GHz BCM2837 central processing unit, like the RPi 3. It provides 1 Gigabytes of LPDDR2 RAM and 4 Gigabytes eMMC Flash. The ‘L’ version is a CM3 without having eMMC Flash, permitting the client to hook up his/her very own SD/eMMC device. The pinout of the CM1 and CM3 modules are identical but the CM3 module is one mm higher (31 mm).

Pricing

The price tag on the new modules isn’t known yet, but as a CM1 retails at about £20, a similar price is likely to be anticipated for the CM3.

In accordance with : https://www.elektormagazine.com/news/raspberry-pi-compute-module-3-cm3-to-hit-the-market-soon

Specs

The CM3 is founded on the Raspberry Pi 3 hardware and is meant for industrial use to offer a economical solution for individuals to make personalised products based upon the Pi hardware and software platform. The Compute Module line is smaller sized and has less capabilities and ports than a regular Raspberry Pi, allowing it to be suited to Internet of Things (IoT) products.

“The module utilizes a standard DDR2 SODIMM form factor, sockets for which are made by several producers, are very easily available in the market, and are easily affordable,” Raspberry Pi COO and hardware lead James Adams said in a blog post.

There are two versions of the CM3. Below are the specifications for both of them:

Standard Version:

BCM2837 chip at as high as 1.2GHz
1Gigabyte RAM
4Gigabyte of on-module eMMC flash

Lite Version:

BCM2837 processor at as high as 1.2GHz
1GB RAM
SD card interface on Module pins thus an individual can hook it up to an eMMC or SD card of their choice

Both versions can be slotted into a newly released Compute Module IO Board V3 (CMIO3) which lets you carry out the following:

Presents needed power to the CM3
Will allow you to program the CM3 Standard’s flash memory or to work with an SD card on the Lite version.
Connect to the processor interfaces in a a little more friendly fashion (pin headers and flexi connectors, much like the Pi)
Supplies the required HDMI and USB connectors allowing you to have an whole system that can boot Raspbian (or maybe the OS that you pick).

“This board features both a starting template for those who want to design with the Compute Module, and a fast way to begin with experimenting with the hardware, and building and testing a system, before going to the fee for making a made to order board,” Adam said.

The older Compute Module model will still be made available, for those who have no need for the CM3’s performance boost. As reported by the Raspberry Pi official mag The MagPi:

“With some caveats, the CM3 may be used a drop-in alternative to the CM1 since they are pin compatible; the CM3 is 1mm taller, on the other hand, while the CPU can pull a lot more current from the VBAT power source line and will definitely bring in considerably more heat under heavy load.”

Raspberry PI 2 B first time Setup (1/2 Hr Process to full GUI and WIFI) + FREE PI 2 Model B’s



To keep up to date with the progress of the Raspberry PI, I have now received my model 2’s, so the fist thing to do is install Raspbian via NOOBS and see how easy it goes in.
The whole process took close to an hour but half of that was waiting for file system expansion and un-attended install stuff + of course I was videoing the whole thing which slowed me down a bit, I estimate the human effort is way under a half hour and the video is edited to 30mins (But no details are missing)

The WIFI Adapters I used that were fully supported right out of the box where as follows
From Element 14: http://canada.newark.com/element14/wifi-dongle/usb-dongle-wlan-150mbps/dp/79X2198?MER=PPSO_N_C_EverywhereElse_None

and from Adafruit: http://www.adafruit.com/products/814

No additional software was required to get the WIFI up and running and as long as you can have a keyboard and HDMI screen hooked up at time of first setup, you can use SSH for later connections as the HDMI and Keyboard are not essential once completed assuming you want to SSH using PUTTY or Tera Term from a PC, MAC or Linux main machine

I am pleased to report the new PI 2 Model B is an excellent improvement and at 35$, a real bargain.

For some reason I had a focusing issue for a couple of mins part way through the vid and my sound was noisy near the end, sorry about that, I had not realized until editing the video, Ill try to do better in future 🙂

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: Exactly Why They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest small PC on the planet, and it’s what its challengers are seeking to say to the remaining of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is launched on the market promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. In truth, there is a new Raspberry Pi killer named NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and costs you $30.

The Raspberry Pi is presented with four models as time goes by. Examples of these are Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recent which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 is built to double check that Raspberry Pi could please anyone with a low-priced PC for computer programming. It’s up-graded CPU with the Cortex A53, Hackaday described, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the best selling of all.

The Raspberry Pi, on the other hand, is not the sole single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a variety more already in the market which is less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net noted.

To start, there’s the Omega 2, featuring a modular nature empowering computer programmers to increase Bluetooth or Global positioning system unit rapidly. It has built-in Wi-Fi and flash storage space; the Operating-system is Linux distribution founded on the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 will set you back $5 and can easily operate on FreeBSD Operating system, and that’s why it is ideal for learners.

The BBC Micro:bit will set you back $16 and is ideal students for their learning and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor chip energizes it internally and it stands out from the remaining thanks to its 5×5 LED matrix. This element gives 25 separately programmable red-colored Led lights for basic output.

In addition, there is the BeagleBone Black, which will set you back $55 and similar to the Raspberry Pi, is additionally a community-supported platform both for lovers and developers. It truely does work super fast; it can boost Linux in only 10-seconds and can develop in less than 5 minutes. It is actually motivated by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 plus 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Yet another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which has been dubbed as the new Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a more robust layout and design and was in a position to incorporate key elements for instance Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. What’s more, it consists of an Infrared receiver, microphone, 8GB memory space, and power and reset switches.

However, the most helpful attribute of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capacity to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and even Debian, Beta News reported. It’s of great help for firm users, programmers, fans, and students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec introduces Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Know more on official web site: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You will find a new Raspberry Pi opponent that is quite low-priced. The reality is, some people might see it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably outstanding layout and design, plus key in-built features just like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

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