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Tag: Raspberry (page 2 of 4)

Domótica e comunicações com Raspberry pi 3 – II



Domótica e comunicações com Raspberry, arduino e asterisk.

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5 Best: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

In this week’s Top 5, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial articles of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be best for web development?
3. How you can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best way to install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Continue reading about the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 premiered four weeks later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the all sorts of Fedora spins obtainable for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a range of recommendations, screenshots, and also my personal thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Proyecto VoIP Asterisk



Servidor de telefonía VoIP con Raspberry Pi B+

Se redirigen las conexiones del router hacia la Raspberry y esta a su
vez enruta el tráfico hacia el terminal Android que tiene una tarjeta sim de datos 3G.

Realizando llamadas externas a través de Internet mediante una Raspberry y Android como HotSpot

jesusamoros@hotmail.com

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

When considering this week’s Top Five, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top five development languages for DevOps.

5 Best pieces of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be best for website design?
3. How you can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build up your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Tips on how to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the first officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched one month later, and ever since then I have been playing around with the several different Fedora spins available for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a bunch of suggestions, screenshots, and also my own individual thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

HSMM Mesh – Raspberry Pi



A short demonstration on using the Raspberry Pi and HSMM Mesh with Asterisk. I have a pc and an IP phone setup to talk via the Raspberry Pi PBX. The Laptop (PC) is actually connected wirelessly to another Mesh node in a different location.

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Five Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

In this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top 5 programming languages for DevOps.

Top 5 pieces of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is ideal for web development?
3. How to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best way to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Continue reading about the 1st formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, as well as initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and since then I have been experimenting with the an assortment of Fedora spins out there for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a array of suggestions, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Asterisk on Raspberry pi with dialpan Basic Tutorial



thanks for watching … if u want little learn about video

visit my blog
learnbybit.blogspot.com

enjoy 🙂 🙂

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Five Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

With regard to this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial article content of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is perfect for website design?
3. Learn how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read on about the first formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in conjunction with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched one month later, and since then I have been experimenting with the a lot of Fedora spins available for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of tricks, screenshots, as well as my personal thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

ระบบIP Video Phone ด้วย Asterisk บน Raspberry Pi



ใช้ Image จาก http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/ แล้วก็เพิ่ม videosupport=yes ในไฟล์ sip_general_custom.conf และในคอนฟิกตรง extension ให้ Allowed Codecs h264 ด้วยครับ ให้ใส่รวมกับ Codecs ของเสียงไปเลย เช่น ulaw&alaw&h264

ขออภัยที่ทำลวกๆ ขอบคุณที่รับชมครับ
https://www.mnc.co.th , https://store.mnc.co.th

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5 Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

On the subject of this week’s Top Five, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, evaluating Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial posts of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is best for web design?
3. Tips on how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your very own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The right way to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in addition to initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published one month later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the all sorts of Fedora spins readily available for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a number of advice, screenshots, and also my own personal thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 7 – Final Install and Recap



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

With regard to this week’s Top Five, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Top content of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be ideal for web design?
3. The way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build your very own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read on about the 1st officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published a month later, and since that time I have been experimenting with the many various Fedora spins designed for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of tips, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Update



This video is an update of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience. The system has now been running for over a month. The last reboot happened 3 weeks ago and its very stable.

Firstly let me apologies! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .

I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

Update IP Products connected via ethernet to the Pi-PBX:

SPA3102 Linksys VOIP Router http://amzn.com/B000FKP55U for helpful guide to configure it to work with asterisk you can check this out http://www.freepbx.org/support/documentation/howtos/howto-linksys-spa-3102-sipura-spa-3000-freepbx

Grandstream IP Devices: http://amzn.com/B002FA1MUK

Snom 870: http://amzn.com/B0030BJELW

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

In this week’s Top 5, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

Top Five content articles of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is best for website development?
3. Tips on how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Create your own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How you can install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read on about the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in conjunction with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published 4 weeks later, and since then I have been experimenting with the many Fedora spins meant for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a range of tricks, screenshots, as well as my own personal thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry Pi OSMC Media Player



Installing the Open Source Media Centre on a Raspberry Pi. You may also like to watch the previous video in which I equip the Raspberry Pi with a case, a wireless keyboard, and a WiFi dongle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-7qU9Z3wWY

You can download OSMC at: https://osmc.tv/

Thomas Sanladerer’s 3D printing channel featured in the video is at: https://www.youtube.com/user/ThomasSanladerer

You may also be interested in my other Raspberry Pi videos, including:

Raspberry Pi Windows 10: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADPwWbFRXMY

Raspberry Pi Windows 3.1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idHQk99E4VA

Raspberry Pi Robotics #1: GPIO Control: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41IO4Qe5Jzw

Raspberry Pi Robotics #2: Zumo Robot: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZSiqj0NZgU

More videos on computing and related topics can be found at: http://www.youtube.com/explainingcomputers

You may also enjoy my other channel at:
http://www.youtube.com/explainingthefuture

And why not join ExplainingComputers.com on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/ExplainingComputerscom/1127867787228693

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: Exactly Why They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest micro computer on this planet, and it is what its rivals are looking to tell the rest of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is launched in the marketplace promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. In reality, there’s a new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and charges $30.

The Raspberry Pi is introduced with four models as time has passed. These include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recently released which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was created to make certain Raspberry Pi has the potential to meet the needs of anyone with a well priced computer for developer work. It’s up-graded Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday revealed, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Priced at $35, the Raspberry Pi is the trendiest of all.

The Raspberry Pi, yet, isn’t the solely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a number more sold in the market that are less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net described.

First of all, there’s the Omega 2, which includes a modular nature allowing for computer programmers to include Wireless bluetooth or Gps system conveniently. It has integrated Wi-Fi and flash storage; the Operating-system is Linux distribution founded on the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 will set you back $5 and can likewise operate on FreeBSD Operating-system, and that is why it is really excellent for university students.

The BBC Micro:bit will set you back $16 and is perfect for learners for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor chip drives it from inside and it is unique from the competition because of the 5×5 LED matrix. This feature delivers 25 individually programmable red Led lights for basic output.

Moreover, there is the BeagleBone Black, which will set you back $55 and exactly like the Raspberry Pi, is yet another community-supported platform both for fans and builders. It truely does work speedy; it is able to boost Linux in around 10 seconds and can develop in below 5 minutes. It is actually fueled by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 plus 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which was called as the most current Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a better made design and layout and was capable to assimilate crucial elements for example Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Further, it comes with an IR receiver, microphone, 8GB storage, and power and reset control buttons.

Yet, the most desirable function of NanoPi M1 Plus is its ability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and also Debian, Beta News expressed. It’s useful for firm users, developers, enthusiasts, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Get more information on official site: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You can find a new Raspberry Pi challenger that is quite budget friendly. To put it accurately, a number of people may view it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably top-notch design and layout, as well as important built-in features similar to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

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