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Tag: Raspberry (page 1 of 3)

1. Raspberry pi 3 connection with laptop without a monitor and a router, tutorial



Hey guys!
It is my first video about raspberry pi. I decided to make it because when I received my raspberry I did’t have opportunity to connect a monitor or keyboard because I study in different country and I have just laptop with my.

I included few part to this video, it is describing how to download raspbian, how to write it to sd card and how to use DHCP of windows, so you don’t need to have a router, and last it is how to connect to raspberry pi by ssh.

Please leave comment below if you have a suggestion or have found a mistake. Thanks, hope it is useful for someone =)

source

Raspberry Pi Alternatives: Precisely Why They’re a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest micro computer in the market, and it is what its competitors are wanting to convey to the rest of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is introduced in the marketplace promising to be the largest one to overcome Raspberry Pi. To put it accurately, there exists a new Raspberry Pi killer named NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and is priced at $30.

The Raspberry Pi is released with 4 versions in recent years. These include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most up-to-date which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was made to make sure that Raspberry Pi can delight a person with a lower priced computer for programming. It’s up-graded Processor with the Cortex A53, Hackaday declared, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most well-known of all.

The Raspberry Pi, nonetheless, isn’t the solely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are plenty more available that cost less, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little bit more, ZD Net published.

For a start, there is the Omega 2, which includes a modular nature which allows programmers to incorporate Wireless bluetooth or Navigation systems rapidly. It has in-built Wi-Fi and flash memory space; the Operating-system is Linux distribution founded on the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 is priced at $5 and can even run on FreeBSD Operating-system, which is why it’s suitable for learners.

The BBC Micro:bit is priced at $16 and is good for learners for their learning and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor drives it from inside and it is different from the remainder due to its 5×5 LED matrix. This function offers 25 separately programmable red-colored Led lights for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which is priced at $55 and similar to the Raspberry Pi, is in addition a community-supported platform both for hobbyists and designers. It truely does work speedy; it can actually boost Linux in lower than 10 seconds and can develop in below 5 minutes. It’s driven by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 coupled with 512MB DDR3 RAM.

One more is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that has been dubbed as the most current Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a more robust design and layout and was capable to combine very important attributes for instance Wi-Fi and Wireless bluetooth. In addition, it contains an Infrared receiver, microphone, 8GB memory, and power and reset control buttons.

However, the most useful element of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and also Debian, Beta News suggested. It is of great help for venture users, developers, hobbyists, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec introduces Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Know more on official webpage: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You will find a new Raspberry Pi contender that is quite economical. To put it accurately, some individuals might see it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably superior design and layout, as well as crucial incorporated features just like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

https://www.betanews.com/2017/03/02/friendlyelec-linux-debian-ubuntu-nanopi-m1-plus-raspberry-pi/

Domótica e comunicações com Raspberry pi 3 – I



Domótica e comunicações com Raspberry, arduino e asterisk.

source

5 Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

With regard to this week’s Top 5, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your individual DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, contrasting Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

Top 5 content of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is most suitable for website development?
3. Find out how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Create your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Find out how to install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Keep reading about the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, together with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched 1 month later, and subsequently I have been experimenting with the a lot of Fedora spins designed for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a assortment of tricks, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 4 – Imaging SD Card



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

5 Most Beneficial: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

In this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, evaluating Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial blogposts of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is perfect for website development?
3. Learn how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The right way to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Please read on about the very first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, together with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published 4 weeks later, and since then I have been playing around with the an assortment of Fedora spins out there for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of suggestions, screenshots, and my personal thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Linphone Raspbian + Asterisk



Voilà un petit essai de portier vidéo sous raspbian.

Matériel :
Un raspberry B
Une webcam Logitech C170 avec Micro Intégré
http://www.amazon.fr/KitSound-Enceinte-compatible-appareils-Android/dp/B0069MWN26
Raspbian Installé
Linphone Installé

Sur la vidéo à droite
1 fenêtre SSH avec alsamixer pour régler le volume
1 fenètre avec linphonecrc pour simuler un appel de la rue

Sur la vidéo à Gauche
Un Linphone sur un PC, mais cela aurait pu être sur un GSM

source

5 Best: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

On the subject of this week’s Top 5, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, evaluating Python and Ruby for website development, and the top 5 development languages for DevOps.

5 blog posts of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is most suitable for website development?
3. Tips on how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build up your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The right way to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the very first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released four weeks later, and since then I have been playing around with the many Fedora spins intended for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This post is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a variety of suggestions, screenshots, as well as my own individual thoughts on the first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Collin’s Lab: PCB Milling



Learn a new way to create printed circuit boards by way of a milling machine. Join Collin as he uses an Othermill to cut the foundation for a simple capacitive synthesizer.

Othermill: https://www.adafruit.com/product/2323

—————————————–
Visit the Adafruit shop online – http://www.adafruit.com

Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe

Join our weekly Show & Tell on G+ Hangouts On Air: http://adafru.it/showtell

Watch our latest project videos: http://adafru.it/latest

New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/

Music by Collin Cunningham: https://soundcloud.com/collinmel
—————————————–

source

Be Aware Of PCB Assembly Capabilities of MOKO Technology

MOKO Technology is one of the top PCB designers and makers in China. The company manufactures PCB Boards of several types, and from various materials. In the following paragraphs, we’re going to discuss about the capabilities of MOKO Technology.

PCB Board Assembly Capabilities

Following are our PCB Board assembly capabilities, which make us one of the most superior and leading makers of PCB Boards:

Ball Grid Array (BGA) Assembly

The BGA assembly is mainly chosen when there exists a need to get rid of overheating problems. This assembly has a effective heat dissipation features, which helps stay away from getting too hot of the circuit.

Surface Mount Technology (SMT) Assembly

In this assembly, parts are mounted directly on the PCB Boards. We have the ability of manual, and also automatic SMT production process. Our SMT assembly capabilities consist of BGA, small chip packages, package-on-package, etcetera.

Through-Hole Assembly

In this assembly, the component leads are inserted through the pre-made holes. Later, they are soldered for protection. We can provide you with two types of Through-Hole assemblies – hand-operated through-hole assembly and automatic through-hole assembly.

Quick Turn Assemblies

We view globally recognized PCB Board standards and guidelines. This is a value added service, allowing you to receive highly solid fast turn PCB assemblies at fast turn-around times. Many of our customers take advantage of this service that we provide.

PCB Board Prototypes Manufacture

PCB Board prototypes aid you in getting a better idea about the final PCBs, or how they are going to be. With a outstanding experience to back us up, we offer the best-in-class prototype manufacturing services to our clients. These PCB prototypes are UL qualified, and we attempt to get them delivered to you in a timely manner.

Low-Mid Volume Production

MOKO Technology is dedicated to offer their service, which helps you assemble low quantity PCB prototype orders. We keep ourselves updated with the newest technologies to stay abreast of the ever changing demands of our consumers.

MOKO Technology is widely recognized for its PCB assembly capabilities which range from a easy Though Hole PCB to a standard Surface Mount (SMT) PCB assembly. We hire a group of hard working pros who have helped us deliver top shelf services and products to our customers from a number of industries.

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 1- The Parts Explained!



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

In this week’s Top Five, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your special DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five development languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial blog posts of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is ideal for web design?
3. The best ways to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Learn how to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, along with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was introduced 4 weeks later, and subsequently I have been playing around with the a lot of Fedora spins for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a assortment of suggestions, screenshots, as well as my own individual thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 6 – Running Free PBX



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

When it comes to this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

Five Top pieces of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be most suitable for website development?
3. Find out how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Learn how to install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Please read on about the very first formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in addition to initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published one month later, and ever since then I have been playing around with the many various Fedora spins for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of suggestions, screenshots, and my personal thoughts on the 1st formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Domótica e comunicações com Raspberry pi 3 – II



Domótica e comunicações com Raspberry, arduino e asterisk.

source

5 Best: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

In this week’s Top 5, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial articles of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be best for web development?
3. How you can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best way to install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Continue reading about the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 premiered four weeks later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the all sorts of Fedora spins obtainable for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a range of recommendations, screenshots, and also my personal thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Proyecto VoIP Asterisk



Servidor de telefonía VoIP con Raspberry Pi B+

Se redirigen las conexiones del router hacia la Raspberry y esta a su
vez enruta el tráfico hacia el terminal Android que tiene una tarjeta sim de datos 3G.

Realizando llamadas externas a través de Internet mediante una Raspberry y Android como HotSpot

jesusamoros@hotmail.com

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

When considering this week’s Top Five, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top five development languages for DevOps.

5 Best pieces of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be best for website design?
3. How you can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build up your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Tips on how to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the first officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched one month later, and ever since then I have been playing around with the several different Fedora spins available for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a bunch of suggestions, screenshots, and also my own individual thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

HSMM Mesh – Raspberry Pi



A short demonstration on using the Raspberry Pi and HSMM Mesh with Asterisk. I have a pc and an IP phone setup to talk via the Raspberry Pi PBX. The Laptop (PC) is actually connected wirelessly to another Mesh node in a different location.

source

Five Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

In this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top 5 programming languages for DevOps.

Top 5 pieces of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is ideal for web development?
3. How to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best way to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Continue reading about the 1st formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, as well as initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and since then I have been experimenting with the an assortment of Fedora spins out there for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a array of suggestions, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

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