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Tag: Raspberry Pi (Computer) (page 1 of 4)

Setup BitCoin ASIC Mining On Raspberry Pi (Raspbian)



How to Set up BFGMiner on the Raspbian on the Raspberry Pi.
Use your USB ASICs with the Low power Raspberry Pi, to get maximum efficiency for power to BTC.

The Rasbian OS does not contain a lot of support for this sort of thing so you need to follow this guide:

Step 0 :
To set-up find out the IP address then SSH into it using PuTTY:
http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/download.html

Step 1: Update to latest Version
sudo aptitude update
sudo aptitude upgrade

Step 2: Install Librarys
sudo apt-get install libusb-1.0-0-dev libcurl4-gnutls-dev libjansson-dev uthash-dev libncurses5-dev libudev-dev autoconf automake libtool pkg-config screen

Step 3: Get BFGMiner
git clone git://github.com/luke-jr/bfgminer
(use: ls to find where it is)
cd bfgminer

Step 4 Configure the Software for Compiling
./autogen.sh
./configure
make
(optional: then use sudo make install to have it system wide. Not advised)

Step 5:Run BFGMiner
(stay in the bfgminer software then use below command changing caps to your settings.)

screen -S Mining ./bfgminer -o stratum+tcp://POOL.com:PORT -u USER -p PASSWORD

Step 6: Using Screen
then to do something else hit
Ctrl A D

and to get back to it use
screen -ls to see your running screens
then screen -r 0000 to get back to your screen

However If you are using Nanofury/Ice Fury you need HIDAPI which is VERY hit and miss and more likely miss than hit at the moment.
git clone git://github.com/signal11/hidapi
cd hidapi
./bootstrap
./configure
make
sudo make install
sudo ldconfig
However this still might not work so check out video tomorrow on Minepeon:

My pool: http://full.sc/1tmZveB
Donations/tips:
BTC: 14uUbzJSi2t5MGgYH72PdTonD22V8drBVN
Doge: DTHbar4BRRmxx2YBjkYj23epzJG7Z2g5cx
Google+ : https://plus.google.com/+Tingawinga5
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/tingawinga5
Folding@home team: 123464
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tingawinga
SubReddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/TingaWinga/
Website: http://www.tingawinga.co.uk Buy Stuff Here: http://bit.ly/2oRV8i9

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: The Reason They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest mini computer on the planet, and it is what its contenders are endeavoring to inform the remaining of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is launched in the marketplace promising to be the largest one to defeat Raspberry Pi. In actual fact, you will find there’s new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and costs $30.

The Raspberry Pi is presented with four models throughout the years. Examples of these are Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the newest which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was made to confirm that Raspberry Pi has the potential to fulfill a person with a lower priced computer for computer programming. It’s upgraded CPU with the Cortex A53, Hackaday explained, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Costing $35, the Raspberry Pi is the hottest-selling of all.

The Raspberry Pi, on the other hand, is not the sole single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a variety more out there that entails lower cost, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net reported.

For starters, there’s the Omega 2, sporting a modular nature enabling developers to incorporate Bluetooth or Gps unit without problems. It has internal Wi-Fi and flash storage; the Operating system is Linux distro founded upon the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 is priced at $5 and can also operate on FreeBSD Operating system, and that is why it is really perfect for college students.

The BBC Micro:bit is priced at $16 and is ideal school students for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor energizes it from inside and it sticks out from the competition because of the 5×5 LED matrix. This feature provides 25 singularly programmable red Led lights for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which is priced at $55 and like the Raspberry Pi, is additionally a community-supported platform both for enthusiasts and coders. It truly does work fast; it can certainly boost Linux in under Ten seconds and can develop in under 5 min’s. It is motorized by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 coupled with 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that has been known as as the new Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a better quality design and layout and was capable to add vital benefits similar to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. In addition, it features an Infrared receiver, microphone, 8GB storage area, and power and reset buttons.

However, the perfect attribute of NanoPi M1 Plus is its power to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and in addition Debian, Beta News described. It is excellent for business users, programmers, amateurs, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec rolls out Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Get more information on official webpage: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You will find there’s new Raspberry Pi rival that is quite affordable. In actual fact, a number of people might consider it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably remarkable design and layout, as well as critical built-in features such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry PI 2, GPIO, SPI, I2C and OneWire Setup



In this post of the Raspberry PI series we look at what is required to setup a Raspberry PI 2 after the initial Raspbian setup. It assumes you have completed “sudo atp-get update” and “sudo apt-get upgrade” or that you install is up to date and you can SSH into the PI from a console using TeraTerm or Putty (Or your own favourite SSH) app.

The process shows how to install and test all the various libraries we will need for the up coming tutorials on adding devices to the PI2 GPIO connector including I2C chips like ADCs and DACs, SPI devices like the 16bit port expander “23S17” from microchip and many others.

Just so you don’t feel like its all install and no practical, In this video I also show how to connect and use a simple one wire device, the DS18B21 from Maxim : http://datasheets.maximintegrated.com/en/ds/DS1821.pdf

One of the libraries we will install is wiringpi by Gordon Henderson : http://wiringpi.com/ a great set of libraries with support for an ever growing set of devices and allowing you to program in C but with the feel that you may be used to with an Arduino. More on this in future episodes

Another source of inspiration is the Adafruit tutorial series, they have done a great job creating these and you should go have a look: Learn @ Adafruit and for the temp sensor, adafruits raspberry-pi lesson 11 ds18b20 temperature sensing

At time of posting I have already filmed the next instalment where I will show you how to control an ADC (ADS1115 – quad 16bit from TI), and two DACs (DAC8574 – quad 16bit, DAC8571 – Single 16bit) it will be posted as soon as I’m done editing it

This preparation will flow into my Power supply project down the road as an example of how to integrate a reasonably powerful controller to the Analogue power system.

An added component in the design will also be a barrier I2C device to provide isolation between the PI and the Power side. Stay tuned

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: How Come They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest tiny PC in the market, and it is what its contenders are attempting to notify the remainder of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is launched out there promising to be the biggest one to take down Raspberry Pi. To put it accurately, there’s a new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and costs $30.

The Raspberry Pi is introduced with 4 variations as time goes by. These consist of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most up-to-date which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 is built to make sure that Raspberry Pi could gratify anybody with a low-cost PC for developer work. It has replaced CPU with the Cortex A53, Hackaday suggested, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most widely used of all.

The Raspberry Pi, on the other hand, is not the single single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a number more for sale that entails lower cost, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net declared.

To start with, there is the Omega 2, that includes a modular nature granting developers to attach Wireless bluetooth or Global positioning system unit comfortably. It has in-built Wi-Fi and flash storage space; the Operating-system is Linux distro based upon the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 will cost you $5 and can easily operate on FreeBSD Operating system, which describes why it really is best for students.

The BBC Micro:bit will cost you $16 and is excellent for school students for their exercising and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex cpu energizes it from inside and it excels from the competition because of its 5×5 LED matrix. This function gives you 25 separately programmable red Led lights for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which will cost you $55 and like the Raspberry Pi, is additionally a community-supported platform both for enthusiasts and builders. It truely does work quick; it can boost Linux in lower than 10 seconds and can develop in less than 5 minutes. It’s powered by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 and 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Someone else is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which was named as the most recent Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a more robust design and layout and was competent to combine key options like Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. In addition, it consists of an Infrared receiver, mic, 8GB memory space, and power and reset control buttons.

Yet, the best feature of NanoPi M1 Plus is its power to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, as well as Debian, Beta News suggested. It’s excellent for business users, coders, fans, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec roll-outs Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Learn more on official webpage: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There is a new Raspberry Pi rival that is quite economical. Believe it or not, some folks might regard it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably remarkable design and layout, plus important incorporated features just like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Using Raspberry Pi without external monitor and keyboard



Guys, please go here: http://www.hellointernetofthings.com/using-raspberry-pi-without-external-monitor-keyboard/
For the whole step by step detail procedure. I described every step with detailed description. Hope this will solve every issue.

For those who have issue with setting up and configure the PC internet how you will use with Raspberry Pi, this post(http://www.hellointernetofthings.com/using-raspberry-pi-without-external-monitor-keyboard/) will solve the issue for them.

Using Raspberry Pi without external monitor and keyboard and sharing the internet connection of the computer from which you are connected.

-I can see many people asking how to use internet. Please do not connect the raspberry pi to the router. you can do that but this setup in the video is not for that. Connect your raspberry pi directly to the LAN port of your PC/laptop and do as i did in the video. (i used my PC as a router for raspberry pi to get internet).

-also changing the ip is for using the pc as router for your raspberry pi. they should be in the same class of ip. as your raspberry is using your pc/pc-ethernet as a router and your pc is connected to internet; your raspberry should get the internet.

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: Precisely Why They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest tiny computer on the planet, and it’s what its rivals are trying to inform the remaining of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is introduced on the market promising to be the biggest one to take down Raspberry Pi. For that matter, you will find a new Raspberry Pi killer named NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and priced at $30.

The Raspberry Pi is released with 4 variations in the past. These comprise of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the newest which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was designed to ensure that Raspberry Pi is able to please anybody with a low-priced computer for computer programming. It has upgraded Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday revealed, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Charging $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most well known of all.

The Raspberry Pi, still, is not the solely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are tons more in the marketplace which is less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little extra, ZD Net published.

To start, there is the Omega 2, that has a modular nature helping developers to introduce Bluetooth or Global positioning system effortlessly. It has integrated Wi-Fi and flash storage space; the OS is Linux distro established on the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 is priced at $5 and can also operate on FreeBSD Operating system, this is why it is appropriate for students.

The BBC Micro:bit is priced at $16 and is ideal learners for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex central processor powers it from the inside and it is unique from the competition thanks to its 5×5 LED matrix. This benefit gives 25 separately programmable red-colored Led lights for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which is priced at $55 and just like the Raspberry Pi, is also a community-supported platform both for lovers and programmers. The system functions rapidly; it could boost Linux in lower than 10 seconds and can develop in less than 5 minutes. It is fueled by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 and 512MB DDR3 RAM.

A fresh one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which was known as as the new Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a better made design and layout and was able to use necessary benefits for instance Wi-Fi and Wireless bluetooth. Additionally, it has got an Infrared receiver, mic, 8GB memory space, and power and reset keys.

Nonetheless, the most beneficial feature of NanoPi M1 Plus is its ability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, as well as Debian, Beta News explained. It is well suited for firm users, programmers, fans, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Learn more on official web site: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There exists a new Raspberry Pi contender that is quite affordable. In truth, some people might see it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an certainly top-quality design and layout, and additionally critical integrated features just like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry Pi GPIO Tutorial: The Basics Explained



This Raspberry Pi GIO tutorial takes you through a lot of the basics of the GPIO pins and what you can do with them

Full Guide: http://pimylifeup.com/raspberry-pi-gpio/

As you may know the general purpose input and output pins (GPIO) are used to communicate with other circuity. This includes thing such as extension boars, circuits, and much more. You can do some pretty cool stuff with them.

You should beware that playing around with the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins wrongly can result in destroying the Pi. The best way to avoid this is to double check that whatever you’re plugging in will be supported by the Pi.

In the little small circuit, I use in the Raspberry Pi GPIO tutorial I use the following equipment.

• 1 100-ohm resistor
• 1x Red LED
• GPIO Breakout Kit Assembled
• Breadboard
• Breadboard Wire/Jumper Cables

There is quite a bit of terminology around these pins but be sure to not let this turn you off from using them. We go into the terminology a little in the video but if you need more information be sure to look up some of the terms I used.

In the video we display a Raspberry Pi GPIO pinout diagram. If you would like this to use for future reference, then be sure head over the guide. You can find the link above.

We will be looking at doing many projects using the GPIO pins in the future. This includes stuff such as home automation! This is something I know a lot of people have been asking about.

I hope you have enjoyed this video on the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins. If you have any questions, feedback or anything else feel free to drop us a comment below. Also be sure to subscribe so you can stay up to date with all our latest Raspberry Pi projects, guides and much more.

source

Raspberry Pi Substitutes: The Reason Why They Are a Better Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest mini computer all over the world, and it is what its opponents are endeavoring to explain to the remainder of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is launched out there promising to be the largest one to overcome Raspberry Pi. The fact is, there’s a new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and is priced at $30.

The Raspberry Pi is introduced with four models in recent years. These include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recently released which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was established to make certain that Raspberry Pi is able to please a person with a better value computer for developer work. It’s upgraded Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday announced, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the best-selling of all.

The Raspberry Pi, even so, isn’t the merely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a variety more sold in the market that is less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little extra, ZD Net announced.

For a start, there’s the Omega 2, that features a modular nature granting computer programmers to add in Wireless bluetooth or Gps system effortlessly. It has integrated Wi-Fi and flash memory; the Operating platform is Linux distro based on the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 is priced at $5 and can even operate on FreeBSD Operating system, and that is why it really is perfect for college students.

The BBC Micro:bit is priced at $16 and is excellent for school students for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex cpu energizes it from the inside and it is different from the others simply because of its 5×5 LED matrix. This feature delivers 25 singularly programmable red LEDs for basic output.

In addition, there is the BeagleBone Black, which is priced at $55 and similar to the Raspberry Pi, is another community-supported platform both for lovers and designers. The system functions rapid; it does boost Linux in only 10-seconds and can develop in below 5 minutes. It’s fueled by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 as well as 512MB DDR3 RAM.

A fresh one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that has been named as the new Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a better made design and layout and was competent to assimilate vital features similar to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. What’s more, it offers an Infrared receiver, microphone, 8GB memory, and power and reset keys.

Yet, the perfect attribute of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capacity to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and also Debian, Beta News revealed. It is appropriate for firm users, developers, lovers, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec launches Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Know more on official site: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There is a new Raspberry Pi competitor that is quite economical. To put it accurately, some individuals may see it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an certainly superb design and layout, plus critical built-in features just like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Build your very own Raspberry Pi Mumble Server



Learn to build a Raspberry Pi Mumble Server in this easy to follow video tutorial. If you’re wondering what a Mumble server is then it is an open source VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) software that allows you to enjoy a low latency but high quality chat.

Full Project here: http://pimylifeup.com/raspberry-pi-mumble-server/

Throughout this tutorial I use a few command lines that you might have trouble making out on screen if so please find them in the order I use them below:

sudo apt-get install mumble-server
sudo dpkg-reconfigure mumble-server
ip addr show
sudo nano /etc/mumble-server.ini
sudo /etc/init.d/mumble-server restart

Installing the mumble server on raspberry pi is a pretty straight forward process and you shouldn’t run into many problems. If you do tho check out my website as it contains a more detailed explanation on installing mumble and you can also comment asking for help!

This is not the only Raspberry Pi VOIP solution there are others such as Asterisk that offers a more complete package such as inbound and outbound calls and much more.

I hope this guide on how to build a Raspberry Pi mumble server has helped you! If you like my projects and would like to see more then you should subscribe so you’re kept up to date with the latest from Pi My Life Up.

source

5 Most Beneficial: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

With regard to this week’s Top Five, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your special DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Top content of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be perfect for website development?
3. Methods to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How one can deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the first officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched one month later, and subsequently I have been playing around with the a variety of different Fedora spins obtainable for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a bunch of suggestions, screenshots, and also my own individual ideas on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

HSMM Mesh – Raspberry Pi



A short demonstration on using the Raspberry Pi and HSMM Mesh with Asterisk. I have a pc and an IP phone setup to talk via the Raspberry Pi PBX. The Laptop (PC) is actually connected wirelessly to another Mesh node in a different location.

source

Five Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

In this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top 5 programming languages for DevOps.

Top 5 pieces of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is ideal for web development?
3. How to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best way to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Continue reading about the 1st formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, as well as initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and since then I have been experimenting with the an assortment of Fedora spins out there for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a array of suggestions, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Home VOIP System using Asterisk PBX



I have just converted my Starhub Singapore land-line phone into an VOIP system using Asterisk PBX. Using this configuration, I can make an outgoing and incoming call using the Softphone installed on my IPad.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

In this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

5 Top content articles of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is the best for web design?
3. The best way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Find out how to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Maintain reading about the first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, along with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the all sorts of Fedora spins readily available for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a number of advice, screenshots, and my own individual ideas on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry Pi FreePBX setup LIVE STREAM



I’m going to be taking an hour or two to set up and configure FreePBX on the Raspberry Pi 2.

Bring your FreePBX or networking questions, as there will be a lot of downtime during this process!

source

Five Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, even more

In this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, contrasting Python and Ruby for website development, and the top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps.

Top Five pieces of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is most suitable for website development?
3. Methods to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How to install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Please read on about the 1st formally supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, together with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and since then I have been experimenting with the several different Fedora spins accessible for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a number of hints, screenshots, along with my own individual thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI2 running Asterisk/app_rpt under Archlinux



via YouTube Capture

source

Five Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, even more

With regard to this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five development languages for DevOps.

5 articles of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is the best for web development?
3. Learn how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Tips on how to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the 1st formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in addition to initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released one month later, and since that time I have been playing around with the all sorts of Fedora spins accessible for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of hints, screenshots, along with my own personal ideas on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

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