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Tag: Pi (page 2 of 3)

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 7 – Final Install and Recap



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

With regard to this week’s Top Five, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Top content of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be ideal for web design?
3. The way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build your very own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read on about the 1st officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published a month later, and since that time I have been experimenting with the many various Fedora spins designed for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of tips, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Update



This video is an update of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience. The system has now been running for over a month. The last reboot happened 3 weeks ago and its very stable.

Firstly let me apologies! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .

I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

Update IP Products connected via ethernet to the Pi-PBX:

SPA3102 Linksys VOIP Router http://amzn.com/B000FKP55U for helpful guide to configure it to work with asterisk you can check this out http://www.freepbx.org/support/documentation/howtos/howto-linksys-spa-3102-sipura-spa-3000-freepbx

Grandstream IP Devices: http://amzn.com/B002FA1MUK

Snom 870: http://amzn.com/B0030BJELW

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

In this week’s Top 5, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

Top Five content articles of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is best for website development?
3. Tips on how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Create your own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How you can install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read on about the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in conjunction with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published 4 weeks later, and since then I have been experimenting with the many Fedora spins meant for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a range of tricks, screenshots, as well as my own personal thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX Basic Install (Asterisk) Phone Server



I do have some more vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .

This video is a remake where I turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?…
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009…
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008…
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

5 Best: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, even more

When it comes to this week’s Top 5, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your special DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps.

Top Five article content of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be best for website design?
3. Methods to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Create your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Methods to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Please read on about the first formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in addition to initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 premiered 1 month later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the a lot of Fedora spins accessible for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a collection of suggestions, screenshots, and also my personal ideas on the very first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry Pi OSMC Media Player



Installing the Open Source Media Centre on a Raspberry Pi. You may also like to watch the previous video in which I equip the Raspberry Pi with a case, a wireless keyboard, and a WiFi dongle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-7qU9Z3wWY

You can download OSMC at: https://osmc.tv/

Thomas Sanladerer’s 3D printing channel featured in the video is at: https://www.youtube.com/user/ThomasSanladerer

You may also be interested in my other Raspberry Pi videos, including:

Raspberry Pi Windows 10: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADPwWbFRXMY

Raspberry Pi Windows 3.1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idHQk99E4VA

Raspberry Pi Robotics #1: GPIO Control: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41IO4Qe5Jzw

Raspberry Pi Robotics #2: Zumo Robot: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZSiqj0NZgU

More videos on computing and related topics can be found at: http://www.youtube.com/explainingcomputers

You may also enjoy my other channel at:
http://www.youtube.com/explainingthefuture

And why not join ExplainingComputers.com on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/ExplainingComputerscom/1127867787228693

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: Exactly Why They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest micro computer on this planet, and it is what its rivals are looking to tell the rest of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is launched in the marketplace promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. In reality, there’s a new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and charges $30.

The Raspberry Pi is introduced with four models as time has passed. These include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recently released which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was created to make certain Raspberry Pi has the potential to meet the needs of anyone with a well priced computer for developer work. It’s up-graded Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday revealed, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Priced at $35, the Raspberry Pi is the trendiest of all.

The Raspberry Pi, yet, isn’t the solely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a number more sold in the market that are less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net described.

First of all, there’s the Omega 2, which includes a modular nature allowing for computer programmers to include Wireless bluetooth or Gps system conveniently. It has integrated Wi-Fi and flash storage; the Operating-system is Linux distribution founded on the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 will set you back $5 and can likewise operate on FreeBSD Operating-system, and that is why it is really excellent for university students.

The BBC Micro:bit will set you back $16 and is perfect for learners for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor chip drives it from inside and it is unique from the competition because of the 5×5 LED matrix. This feature delivers 25 individually programmable red Led lights for basic output.

Moreover, there is the BeagleBone Black, which will set you back $55 and exactly like the Raspberry Pi, is yet another community-supported platform both for fans and builders. It truely does work speedy; it is able to boost Linux in around 10 seconds and can develop in below 5 minutes. It is actually fueled by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 plus 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which was called as the most current Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a better made design and layout and was capable to assimilate crucial elements for example Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Further, it comes with an IR receiver, microphone, 8GB storage, and power and reset control buttons.

Yet, the most desirable function of NanoPi M1 Plus is its ability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and also Debian, Beta News expressed. It’s useful for firm users, developers, enthusiasts, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Get more information on official site: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You can find a new Raspberry Pi challenger that is quite budget friendly. To put it accurately, a number of people may view it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably top-notch design and layout, as well as important built-in features similar to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry Pi tutorial: Use SSH to in order to remote control your Raspberry Pi.



SSH protocol can be very useful if we want to remote control our Raspberry Pi. I am using a Raspberry Pi A+ board in this video but you can use any Raspberry Pi board you like.

So far, when we wanted to use our Raspberry Pi, we were using a keyboard, a mouse and a monitor via the HDMI port, or a touch screen like this one. The second method is easier and portable. I have prepared a detailed tutorial on that touch screen display a few weeks ago, you can check it out. But if we want an even easier solution, we can use our desktop computer, or laptop, or even our cell phone to remotely control the Raspberry Pi. Check this out, I am running a terminal on my Android cell phone and I can execute commands on my Raspberry Pi. I will now run a simple program I wrote in order to light up this LED. Cool, isn’t it? But very useful as well! Let’s see how we can achieve that!

——————–
WHERE TO BUY
——————–

1. Raspberry Pi 2: http://goo.gl/H87sNN

2. 5” TFT Display: http://goo.gl/i5LJIM

3. Small Wi-Fi Dongle: http://goo.gl/jvq0MS

4. LED: http://bit.ly/375LEDS

5. Wires: http://bit.ly/WiresArduino

6. Resistor: http://bit.ly/ResistorsB

7. Breadboard mini: http://bit.ly/MiniBreadboard

Full disclosure: All of the links above are affiliate links. I get a small percentage of each sale they generate. Thank you for your support!

Secure Shell or SSH is a cryptographic network protocol to allow remote login to other network services to operate securely over an unsecured network. Using SSH we can remotely login to a system and execute commands. In this case, the system we want to login to, is the Raspberry Pi. SSH protocol allow us to gain access to the command line of the Raspberry Pi from another computer, but only on the same network. Let’s now see how to setup our systems in order to achieve that.

SHH is built into the Raspbian distribution that we are using, so all we have to do is to setup the network connection for our Raspberry Pi board. I am using a Raspberry Pi A+ today, but you can use any Raspberry Pi board you like. I replaced the big WiFi dongle I was using so far, with this tiny and cheap one I got from Gearbest.com. It is working fine and it is plug and play, there is no need to install anything at all. It makes things more compact. You can find a link for it in the description of the video. All we have to do now, is to boot our Raspberry Pi once and set up the WiFi password. Next we have to run the command sudo ifconfig in order to get the IP address of our Raspberry Pi. Note this address as we are going to need it. In my case the address is this 192.168.1.44. Most routers, assign a different IP address each time we connect our Raspberry Pi board to the network. So, we have to make the IP address of the Raspberry Pi a static one. In order to achieve that I logged in my routers settings page, and defined that I want my Raspberry Pi board to have a specific IP address, 192.168.1.44. Check your Router settings and see how to set your Raspberry Pi to have a static IP.

——————–
Physics Experiments Puzzle Game
——————–

You can download my latest Android Game which is called Incredible Physics Experiments here:

? http://bit.ly/IncredibleExperiments

——————–
MORE PROJECTS
——————–
Arduino Datalogger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oei3Y6tOhVI
Arduino Weather Station Project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jN-3DtS1RI
Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD Display: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDwrMeu4k9Y
Arduino OLED display tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9EwJ7M7OsI
DIY Arduino: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npc3uzEVvc0

——————–
ABOUT EDUC8S.TV
——————–
Educ8s.tv is a Youtube channel and website which is dedicated in developing high quality videos about DIY hardware and software projects. In this channel we develop projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, we build robots and simple electronic circuits. Check out our website as well for more information: http://www.educ8s.tv

——————–
SUBSCRIBE ON YOUTUBE
——————–

Never miss a video: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=educ8s

source

Raspberry Pi Substitutes: How Come They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest tiny PC on the globe, and it’s what its challengers are endeavoring to notify the remainder of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is introduced in the marketplace promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. In fact, you will find a new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and charges $30.

The Raspberry Pi is released with 4 variations as time passes. These comprise of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most current which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was established to ensure that Raspberry Pi could please anybody with a low-cost PC for developer work. It has improved CPU with the Cortex A53, Hackaday stated, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Priced at $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most widely used of all.

The Raspberry Pi, nevertheless, is not the single single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a number more in the market which will cost less, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little extra, ZD Net expressed.

For starters, there’s the Omega 2, that features a modular nature allowing software engineers to put in Bluetooth or Gps system rapidly. It has inbuilt Wi-Fi and flash memory space; the OS is Linux distribution established on the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 costs you $5 and can even operate on FreeBSD Operating system, and that is why it is really excellent for students.

The BBC Micro:bit costs you $16 and is excellent for students for their learning and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor energizes it from inside and it is unique from the competition for its 5×5 LED matrix. This benefit offers you 25 separately programmable red-colored LEDs for basic output.

Similarly, there is the BeagleBone Black, which costs you $55 and like the Raspberry Pi, is another community-supported platform both for amateurs and designers. It truly does work speedy; it can actually boost Linux in just 10 seconds and can develop in below 5 min’s. It is actually motivated by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 combined with 512MB DDR3 RAM.

One more is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which has been referred to as as the new Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a sturdier design and layout and was competent to merge notable elements similar to Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. Additionally, it has got an IR receiver, microphone, 8GB storage area, and power and reset control buttons.

Nevertheless, the perfect element of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capacity to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and even Debian, Beta News described. It is an excellent option for company users, coders, hobbyists, and students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec introduces Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi substitute

Learn more on official website: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You can find a new Raspberry Pi rival that is quite budget friendly. In reality, some people may consider it as a Pi substitute. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably top-notch design and layout, along with essential built-in features like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry Pi – Adding Bluetooth



In this video we will be looking at using a usb dongle with the raspberry pi and how to connect a bluetooth enabled device, in this case an android cell phone, to the pi.

Helpful links:

Raspberry Pi Bluetooth Setup
http://www.pridopia.co.uk/rs-pi-set-bluetooth.html

Connect smart device to PI
http://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?p=521067

Support the channel tip with bitcoins
Address: 1MvcZHRbDm9czS8s776iutBBPJ39K4PEHh

Follow me on Instructables
http://www.instructables.com/member/misperry

Follow me on Twitter

T-Shirts
http://www.zazzle.com/misperry

source

Raspberry Pi Substitutes: Exactly Why They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest small PC on the globe, and it’s what its rivals are endeavoring to inform the rest of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is launched on the market promising to be the biggest one to overcome Raspberry Pi. To put it accurately, you will find there’s new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and priced at $30.

The Raspberry Pi is released with 4 variations in recent years. Examples of these are Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the latest which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was created to ensure that Raspberry Pi will satisfy a person with a low-priced PC for coding. It has improved Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday revealed, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the best selling of all.

The Raspberry Pi, unfortunately, isn’t the solely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are tons more for sale which are less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net described.

First off, there’s the Omega 2, sporting a modular nature permitting coders to introduce Bluetooth or GPS straightforwardly. It has internal Wi-Fi and flash storage area; the Operating platform is Linux distro on top of the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 charges $5 and can also operate on FreeBSD Operating-system, this is why it really is great for college students.

The BBC Micro:bit charges $16 and is just the thing for learners for their learning and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor chip energizes it internally and it is unique from the remainder due to the 5×5 LED matrix. This attribute delivers 25 individually programmable red Led lights for basic output.

There’s also the BeagleBone Black, which charges $55 and much like the Raspberry Pi, is in addition a community-supported platform both for enthusiasts and developers. The system functions speedy; it is able to boost Linux in less than 10 seconds and can develop in under Five minutes. It’s motorized by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 and 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that was named as the new Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a more robust design and layout and was in a position to integrate worthwhile benefits for instance Wi-Fi and Wireless bluetooth. What’s more, it offers you an IR receiver, mic, 8GB memory space, and power and reset keys.

And yet, the most beneficial attribute of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, as well as Debian, Beta News revealed. It’s useful for company users, programmers, lovers, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec rolls out Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi alternative

Find out more on official web site: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There’s a new Raspberry Pi opponent that is quite cheap. In truth, some individuals may consider it as a Pi alternative. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an certainly superior design and layout, as well as essential included features like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Noobs Installation Tutorial



Buy your Raspberry Pi 3 Starter Kit Here:
http://go.magik.ly/ml/2ips/

If you’re anything like me you’ve had a Raspberry Pi sitting on your shelf for a while and you’re not quite sure what to do with it. Well I’m here to show you what you can do.

I’m MrVestek and your Raspberry Pi Ally. Back once again and better than ever as I’ve been upgraded to version 3.0!

In this tutorial we show you how to install Noobs on your Raspberry Pi which is your first step in installing the many wonderful operating systems available for The Raspberry Pi 3!

With built in Bluetooth and WiFi this device is now a little powerhouse with multiple possibilities.

Tune in for Episode 2 available soon where we will build our own home entertainment centre using Openelec.

Don’t know how to use Linux? No problem, this tutorial doesn’t require any prior Linux knowledge, I’ve tried to make it as easy as possible to follow!

Required software:
SD Card Formatter Tool – https://www.sdcard.org/downloads/formatter_4/
Noobs – https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/noobs/

Music Credits:
8bit Dungeon Level – Kevin MacLeod (http://www.incompetech.com)
Just Keep Intro Bits – Teknoaxe (http://www.teknoaxe.com)
Hero’s Day Off – Teknoaxe (http://www/teknoaxe.com)

source

Raspberry Pi Substitutes: Reasons Why They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest tiny PC on the planet, and it’s what its opponents are trying to tell the remainder of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is released out there promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. In actual fact, you will find there’s new Raspberry Pi killer named NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and charges $30.

The Raspberry Pi is released with four variations throughout the years. These comprise of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recent which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 is built to make certain that Raspberry Pi is able to delight anyone with a well priced PC for programming. It’s improved CPU with the Cortex A53, Hackaday reported, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Costing $35, the Raspberry Pi is the best selling of all.

The Raspberry Pi, even so, is not the only single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are lots more in the market which be less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little bit more, ZD Net described.

To begin with, there’s the Omega 2, sporting a modular nature making it possible for software engineers to incorporate Wireless bluetooth or GPS easily. It has in-built Wi-Fi and flash memory space; the Operating system is Linux distribution stemmed from the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 costs $5 and can easily operate on FreeBSD Operating system, and that is why it truly is a good choice for college students.

The BBC Micro:bit costs $16 and is appropriate for school students for their learning and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex cpu powers it from inside and it stands out from the others simply because of its 5×5 LED matrix. This benefit gives you 25 individually programmable red LEDs for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which costs $55 and just like the Raspberry Pi, is one more community-supported platform both for fans and designers. It functions quickly; it is able to boost Linux in less than 10 seconds and can develop in within 5 minutes. It is actually pushed by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 combined with 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Someone else is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that was known as as the most current Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a better made design and layout and was able to add critical abilities such as Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. In addition, it possesses an Infrared receiver, mic, 8GB storage, and power and reset switches.

On the other hand, the top function of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capacity to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and also Debian, Beta News announced. It’s well suited for firm users, programmers, enthusiasts, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Know more on official webpage: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There is a new Raspberry Pi competitor that is quite budget friendly. In fact, some individuals may see it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an certainly excellent design and layout, as well as essential incorporated features such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry Pi – How to SSH – Remote view your Pi…



In this tutorial I show you how to SSH into your Pi in Windows. I explain what SSH is, the dangers, how to use it on your local network, how to find your Pi’s IP address, explain how to use it outside of your network (port forwarding) and how to view your ENTIRE Pi’s desktop! I hope you enjoy it!

Logo designs/ ideas:
theraspberrypiguy@gmail.com

Code and download links:

To find out your Pi’s IP address: ifconfig (line starting inet!)

PuTTY download: http://putty.en.softonic.com/

Xming (X11 server) download: http://sourceforge.net/projects/xming/

Please tell me if any of the links are incorrect or if any of my tutorials content is false!
theraspberrypiguy@gmail.com

Happy Piing!

The Raspberry Pi Guy
Matt

NOTE: The competition is now over! Thank you David Ryan!

source

Raspberry Pi Alternatives: Reasons Why They’re a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest micro PC on the globe, and it’s what its challengers are trying to explain to the rest of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is released on the market promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. Indeed, you will find a new Raspberry Pi killer known as NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and is priced at $30.

The Raspberry Pi is introduced with 4 versions in recent years. They include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recent which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was made to double check that Raspberry Pi will suit anybody with an economical PC for computer programming. It has upgraded Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday declared, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most popular of all.

The Raspberry Pi, having said that, isn’t the only single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are lots more available on the market which is less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little more, ZD Net noted.

To begin with, there’s the Omega 2, sporting a modular nature enabling developers to introduce Wireless bluetooth or Global positioning systems quickly. It has in-built Wi-Fi and flash storage space; the Operating platform is Linux distro on top of the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 is priced at $5 and can easily run on FreeBSD Operating system, which is the reason it’s an excellent option for high school students.

The BBC Micro:bit is priced at $16 and is best for learners for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor chip powers it internally and it sticks out from the others because of the 5×5 LED matrix. This feature presents 25 singularly programmable red-colored Led lights for basic output.

And also, there is the BeagleBone Black, which is priced at $55 and much like the Raspberry Pi, is one more community-supported platform both for lovers and designers. It truly does work speedy; it can actually boost Linux in merely 10 seconds and can develop in under Five min’s. It’s motorized by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 combined with 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which was titled as the new Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a tougher layout and design and was competent to merge useful attributes including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Also, it offers an Infrared receiver, microphone, 8GB storage, and power and reset keys.

Nonetheless, the most excellent element of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capacity to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and Debian, Beta News expressed. It is ideal for venture users, developers, lovers, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Get more information on official webpage: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There is a new Raspberry Pi opponent that is quite competitively priced. For that matter, some individuals may regard it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably top-quality layout and design, along with key included features such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry Pi – Mini LCD Display Tutorial



Liquid-crystal goodness anyone?!

That’s right! In today’s tutorial I show you how to wire up and program your very own mini LCD display to your Raspberry Pi! By the end the of this video you will be printing your own messages to your very own screen module and will understand all of the Python code behind it. A good, cheap and enjoyable little project for Raspberry Pi – with plenty of scope for your own further developments!

INFORMATION:

Raspberry Pi Raspbian official download: https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads

Grab an LCD display for under £5 here: https://ryanteck.uk/displays/11-16×2-character-i2c-lcd-display-0635648607139.html?search_query=16×2&results=3

Need some female-to-female jumper wires? Grab those here too: https://ryanteck.uk/cables/61-jumper-wires.html?search_query=jumper+wires&results=7#/14-jumper_wire_length-30cm_118/12-jumper_wire_pins-female_to_female

Take a look at the code and installation script here: https://github.com/the-raspberry-pi-guy/lcd

COMMANDS:

Install all of the code: git clone https://github.com/the-raspberry-pi-guy/lcd

Change into the new directory with downloaded code: cd lcd

Install the required software: sudo sh install.sh

View either of the demo programs with: nano program_name.py

Run either of the demo programs with: python program_name.py

Thanks for watching! Don’t forget to like, subscribe and share!

The Raspberry Pi Guy

Y U NO SUBSCRIBE?! source

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) digs up gadgets

Sort of announced in July 2016, the most up to date Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) is considered to go to the market in the near future. Last Oct computer equipment maker NEC already announced a new array of professional P and V Series large format displays that gracefully embed the RPi CM3 module. The new module, available in 2 flavors – CM3 and CM3L (lite) – will complement the CM1 module released some years ago.

Specifications for the CM1, CM3 and CM3L SODIMM modules appear in the data sheet found on the RPi website
https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/computemodule/RPI-CM-DATASHEET-V1_0.pdf
. Where the CM1 was based on a BCM2835 processor (as used on the original RPi and RPi B+ models), the CM3 has a quad core 1.2 GHz BCM2837 CPU, the same as the RPi 3. It provides 1 GB of LPDDR2 RAM and 4 GB eMMC Flash. The ‘L’ version is a CM3 with no eMMC Flash, allowing the owner to link up his/her individual SD/eMMC system. The pinout of the CM1 and CM3 modules are the same but the CM3 module is one millimeter higher (31 millimeters).

Cost

The money necessary for the new modules isn’t known yet, but since a CM1 retails at roughly £20, a matching price may well be estimated for the CM3.

Derived from : https://www.elektormagazine.com/news/raspberry-pi-compute-module-3-cm3-to-hit-the-market-soon

Specs

The CM3 is founded upon the Raspberry Pi 3 hardware and is ideal for industrial use to offer a economical opportinity for folks to make customized products based on the Pi software and hardware system. The Compute Module line is smaller and has less attributes and ports than a standard Raspberry Pi, allowing it to be to suit Internet of Things (IoT) products.

“The module works with a standard DDR2 SODIMM form factor, sockets for which are made by several producers, are effortlessly accessible, and are cheap,” Raspberry Pi COO and hardware lead James Adams explained in a post.

There are two designs of the CM3. Below are the technical specs for both:

Standard Version:

BCM2837 chip at to a maximum of 1.2GHz
1Gigabyte RAM
4Gigabyte of on-module eMMC flash

Lite Version:

BCM2837 processor at to a maximum of 1.2GHz
1GB RAM
SD card interface on Module pins so a user can hook this up to an eMMC or SD card of their choice

Both variants can be slotted into a newly released Compute Module IO Board V3 (CMIO3) which lets you perform the following:

Provides needed power to the CM3
Permits you to program the CM3 Standard’s flash memory or to work with an SD card on the Lite version.
Connect to the processor interfaces in a a little more friendly fashion (pin headers and flexi connectors, just like the Pi)
Provides the needed HDMI and USB connectors allowing you to have an entire system that can boot Raspbian (or perhaps the Operating-system of your choosing).

“This board features both a starting template for those who want to design with the Compute Module, and a faster way to begin with experimenting with the hardware, and building and testing a system, before you go to the fee for fabricating a custom board,” Adam said.

The older Compute Module model will still be provided, for individuals that wouldn’t like the CM3’s performance boost. Based on the Raspberry Pi official magazine The MagPi:

“With a few caveats, the CM3 can be used a drop-in substitute for the CM1 since they’re pin compatible; the CM3 is 1mm taller, however, while the CPU can pull considerably more current from the VBAT power supply line and will definitely contribute to a whole lot more heat under heavy load.”

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