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Tag: Pi (page 1 of 3)

How To: Install Kali Linux On A Raspberry Pi



In this tutorial, I’m going to teach you how to install Kali Linux on your Raspberry Pi’s SD card using Mac OS X.

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Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: The Reason They Are a Better Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest small computer across the world, and it’s what its challengers are seeking to inform the remainder of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is released on the market promising to be the biggest one to beat Raspberry Pi. In fact, there is a new Raspberry Pi killer named NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and costs $30.

The Raspberry Pi is presented with four versions over time. Included in these are Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most recent which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was designed to guarantee that Raspberry Pi could please anyone with a low-cost computer for developer work. It’s improved Processor with the Cortex A53, Hackaday revealed, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Costing $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most widely used of all.

The Raspberry Pi, still, isn’t the only single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a number more for sale that are less costly, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a bit more, ZD Net described.

To begin with, there is the Omega 2, that features a modular nature making it possible for programmers to integrate Wireless bluetooth or Gps unit without problems. It has internal Wi-Fi and flash memory space; the OS is Linux distribution founded on the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 charges $5 and can also operate on FreeBSD Operating system, which is the reason it is really created for students.

The BBC Micro:bit charges $16 and is just the thing for school students for their learning and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex central processor powers it from the inside and it sticks out from the others thanks to its 5×5 LED matrix. This attribute gives you 25 individually programmable red-colored Led lights for basic output.

There’s also the BeagleBone Black, which charges $55 and exactly like the Raspberry Pi, is another community-supported platform both for amateurs and programmers. It truely does work quick; it does boost Linux in less than 10-seconds and can develop in less than 5 min’s. It is motivated by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 plus 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which has been known as as the newest Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a better quality layout and design and was capable to incorporate vital attributes for example Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Additionally, it carries an IR receiver, microphone, 8GB storage space, and power and reset keys.

Even so, the most beneficial function of NanoPi M1 Plus is its ability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and Debian, Beta News reported. It’s useful for enterprise users, programmers, collectors, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec rolls out Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Discover more on official site: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You will find a new Raspberry Pi opponent that is quite economical. To put it accurately, a lot of people might see it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an certainly superb layout and design, as well as valuable in-built features like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Raspberry Pi – USB Webcam



In this video I show you how to get started using a USB webcam with our Raspberry Pi.

Commands:
sudo apt-get install fswebcam
sudo fswebcam image.jpg
sudo fswebcam -r 1280×720 –no-banner image2.jpg
sudo nano webcam.sh
sudo chmod +x webcam.sh
./webcam.sh

Website: http://www.mrhobbytronics.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MrHobbytronics
Facebook: http://facebook.com/MrHobbytronics

source

Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: The Reason Why They’re a Better Buy

Raspberry Pi isn’t the baddest micro PC all over the world, and it’s what its rivals are looking to tell the remainder of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is launched in the marketplace promising to be the biggest one to overcome Raspberry Pi. Actually, you will find there’s new Raspberry Pi killer named NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and costs you $30.

The Raspberry Pi is released with four versions in the past. These include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most current which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was established to be sure Raspberry Pi can delight anybody with a well priced PC for developer work. It’s upgraded Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday suggested, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Charging $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most popular of all.

The Raspberry Pi, nevertheless, isn’t the merely single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are a variety more out there that come in less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for some extra, ZD Net announced.

Firstly, there’s the Omega 2, featuring a modular nature helping computer programmers to add Wireless bluetooth or Gps navigation rapidly. It has internal Wi-Fi and flash storage space; the Operating system is Linux distribution based on the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 costs $5 and is also able to operate on FreeBSD Operating system, its no wonder that it is of great help for school students.

The BBC Micro:bit costs $16 and is appropriate for learners for their training and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor chip powers it internally and it is unique from the remaining thanks to its 5×5 LED matrix. This function provides 25 separately programmable red Led lights for basic output.

Also, there is the BeagleBone Black, which costs $55 and just like the Raspberry Pi, is one more community-supported platform both for amateurs and programmers. It works quick; it does boost Linux in below 10 seconds and can develop in less than 5 minutes. It is powered by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 plus 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Another one is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that has been referred to as as the most recent Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a tougher design and layout and was able to include very important attributes for example , Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. In addition, it comes with an IR receiver, mic, 8GB memory space, and power and reset keys.

Nevertheless, the most excellent function of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capacity to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, plus Debian, Beta News revealed. It is a good choice for enterprise users, developers, amateurs, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec roll-outs Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Get more info on official webpage: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

You can find a new Raspberry Pi competitor that is quite cheap. In reality, many people might view it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably exceptional design and layout, and additionally key integrated features just like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Samsung Gear Fit 2 / Test Opinia Recenzja Review [PL]



Cześć! Zapraszam na recenzję inteligentnej opaski Samsung Gear Fit 2. Ma ona za zadanie pomagać nam w prowadzeniu aktywnego, a zarazem zdrowego trybu życia. Oprócz tego możemy dzięki niej odczytywać powiadomienia, sterować muzyką w smartfonie i wiele innych. Czy warto się więc nią zainteresować? Wszystkiego dowiecie się w tym materiale!
———-
Więcej na http://kapsologicznie.pl/
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/kapsologicznie
Twitter https://twitter.com/Kapsologicznie
Instagram https://instagram.com/kacperzarski/
Może zasubskrybujesz? 😉 https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=KacperZarski
Grafika wykonana przez @JuIIiette https://twitter.com/JuIIiette

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Phone Calling on a Raspberry Pi



Answer and make calls right from your Raspberry Pi. Here’s how to get going by making and receiving phone calls.

source

Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

With regard to this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 pieces of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is perfect for website design?
3. How one can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your very own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Methods to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the first formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, together with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released one month later, and after that I have been playing around with the many Fedora spins obtainable for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a variety of hints, screenshots, and also my own individual thoughts on the very first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 4 – Imaging SD Card



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

5 Most Beneficial: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

In this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, evaluating Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial blogposts of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is perfect for website development?
3. Learn how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your personal DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The right way to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Please read on about the very first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, together with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published 4 weeks later, and since then I have been playing around with the an assortment of Fedora spins out there for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of suggestions, screenshots, and my personal thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 1- The Parts Explained!



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

In this week’s Top Five, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your special DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five development languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial blog posts of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is ideal for web design?
3. The best ways to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Learn how to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, along with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was introduced 4 weeks later, and subsequently I have been playing around with the a lot of Fedora spins for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a assortment of suggestions, screenshots, as well as my own individual thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 6 – Running Free PBX



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

When it comes to this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

Five Top pieces of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be most suitable for website development?
3. Find out how to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Learn how to install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Please read on about the very first formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in addition to initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published one month later, and ever since then I have been playing around with the many various Fedora spins for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of suggestions, screenshots, and my personal thoughts on the 1st formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

HSMM Mesh – Raspberry Pi



A short demonstration on using the Raspberry Pi and HSMM Mesh with Asterisk. I have a pc and an IP phone setup to talk via the Raspberry Pi PBX. The Laptop (PC) is actually connected wirelessly to another Mesh node in a different location.

source

Five Top: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

In this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, reviewing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top 5 programming languages for DevOps.

Top 5 pieces of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is ideal for web development?
3. How to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best way to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Continue reading about the 1st formally supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, as well as initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and since then I have been experimenting with the an assortment of Fedora spins out there for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a array of suggestions, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry PI to PBX – Part 7 – Final Install and Recap



This video is a part of a DIY series where I figure out if it is possible to turn a Raspberry PI into a FreePBX phone server! It worked and was relatively easy for tech head with little Linux experience.

Firstly let me apologies! A number of times in the install and explanation I reference the 64gb SD card as a 64mb card! Fail on my part and please don’t pick me up on it all the time! I know I’m a numpty! All the filming was done on my Iphone! I didn’t want to spend hours editing this! But I do have some more professional looking vids on my channel www.youtube.com/whackstar .
I used the following sources to help build the server. I want to say thank you to the guys at Raspberry PI it is truly a great little machine and your site was very helpful. I also want to say thanks to the guys at Raspberry Pi to Asterisk. Your image worked amazingly well! I will be sending you a thank you in the form of a paypal donation sometime soon.

Parts Amazon Links:
Raspberry PI Cases: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_pc?_encoding=UTF8&field-brandtextbin=Multicomp&node=172282
Raspberry PI: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009SQQF9C/ref=oh_details_o03_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
SD Card 64Gb (I mean it!): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008AN1C1A/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Charger: I used and old Blackberry Charger!

Web Resources:
Information about the Raspberry PI and recommended starter images: www.raspberrypi.org
Information about Raspberry PI to FreePBX: http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/
Information about FreePBX: http://www.freepbx.org/
Guide how to install webmin: http://www.webmin.com/deb.html
My own personal site: www.waynehackman.com

I would be very happy to answer any questions you can tweet me at whackman or email me at wayne@waynehackman.com

Thanks so much for watching please rate and subscribe and if you are really nice I can do another additional video talking about the gear and trunks the PI-PBX connects to.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

With regard to this week’s Top Five, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Top content of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be ideal for web design?
3. The way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build your very own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read on about the 1st officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was published a month later, and since that time I have been experimenting with the many various Fedora spins designed for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of tips, screenshots, along with my own personal thoughts on the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

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