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Raspberry Pi 2: Quick Start using NOOBS for Beginners (Install Raspbian)



In this episode of Jordan’s Tech Show, I will show you step-by-step on how to quick start your Raspberry Pi using NOOBS to install Raspbian, the recommended Linux operating system of Raspberry Pi. The Raspberry Pi Board that was used in the video is Raspberry Pi 2 Model B, which is the latest version of RPi.
By Jordan’s Tech Show

——Links & Commands—–

Download Link of NOOBS: https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/noobs/
Download Link of SD Card Formatter:
https://www.sdcard.org/downloads/formatter_4/
Command to enter GUI mode:
startx – and then press enter

source

Raspberry Pi Alternatives: How Come They Are a Greater Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest small computer across the globe, and it’s what its rivals are looking to say to the remaining of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is introduced out there promising to be the largest one to take down Raspberry Pi. In actual fact, you will find there’s new Raspberry Pi killer known as NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and priced at $30.

The Raspberry Pi is launched with 4 models in recent years. These comprise of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most up-to-date which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was established to confirm that Raspberry Pi could fulfill anybody with a better value computer for programming. It has upgraded Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday revealed, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most well liked of all.

The Raspberry Pi, even so, is not the only single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are plenty more on the market which are less costly, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a little bit more, ZD Net described.

For a start, there’s the Omega 2, having a modular nature empowering computer programmers to bring in Bluetooth or Gps navigation with ease. It has built-in Wi-Fi and flash storage area; the OS is Linux distro based on the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 will set you back $5 and also can operate on FreeBSD Operating system, this is why it is really worthwhile for high school students.

The BBC Micro:bit will set you back $16 and is perfect for school students for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex cpu powers it internally and it stands out from the rest due to its 5×5 LED matrix. This benefit offers 25 independently programmable red LEDs for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which will set you back $55 and exactly like the Raspberry Pi, is another community-supported platform both for lovers and developers. It truely does work rapidly; it can boost Linux in below 10-seconds and can develop in less than Five minutes. It’s motivated by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 as well as 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Someone else is the NanoPi M1 Plus, which has been referred to as as the new Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a better quality design and layout and was in a position to combine critical functions for example Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. What’s more, it presents an Infrared receiver, mic, 8GB memory, and power and reset keys.

But, the most useful feature of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, as well as Debian, Beta News described. It is great for venture users, coders, enthusiasts, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec launches Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Learn more on official web site: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There exists a new Raspberry Pi challenger that is quite budget friendly. The fact is, some folks might see it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably superb design and layout, plus critical incorporated features like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Setup a Raspberry Pi Web Server (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP, SSH)



Here’s how to setup a Raspberry Pi as a simple web server. We use the Raspbian distribution of Linux, then install Apache, MySQL and PHP. We also use Tera Term and Swish SFTP to make it easy to connect to the Raspberry Pi from within Windows 10.

This video is a prelude to an upcoming video where I show how to have an Arduino communicate with a web server. Stay tuned for that!

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Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: How Come They’re a Better Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest tiny PC across the world, and it is what its competitors are wanting to notify the rest of the world. Now and then, a fresh mini computer is released in the marketplace promising to be the largest one to beat Raspberry Pi. If truth be told, there’s a new Raspberry Pi killer called NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and charges $30.

The Raspberry Pi is released with four variants in recent years. They include Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most up-to-date which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was established to make certain that Raspberry Pi is able to please anyone with a low-cost PC for programming. It has improved Processor chip with the Cortex A53, Hackaday suggested, and runs on 1.2 GHz. Charging $35, the Raspberry Pi is the hottest of all.

The Raspberry Pi, on the other hand, is not the only single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are tons more on the market which is less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a bit more, ZD Net announced.

To start with, there is the Omega 2, sporting a modular nature letting computer programmers to introduce Bluetooth or GPS with ease. It has inbuilt Wi-Fi and flash memory space; the Operating-system is Linux distro founded on the OpenWrt program. The Omega 2 will set you back $5 and can operate on FreeBSD Operating system, and that’s why it’s created for university students.

The BBC Micro:bit will set you back $16 and is ideal school students for their studying and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex central processor energizes it internally and it excels from others in the industry for the 5×5 LED matrix. This element offers 25 singularly programmable red-colored LEDs for basic output.

There is also the BeagleBone Black, which will set you back $55 and similar to the Raspberry Pi, is one more community-supported platform both for hobbyists and builders. It really works rapid; it is able to boost Linux in under Ten seconds and can develop in under Five min’s. It is actually driven by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 and 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Someone else is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that was named as the most recent Raspberry Pi killer. Priced at $30, it promises to have a tougher design and layout and was competent to merge critical elements such as Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. Additionally, it provides an Infrared receiver, microphone, 8GB storage, and power and reset control buttons.

Though, the greatest element of NanoPi M1 Plus is its capability to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and also Debian, Beta News revealed. It’s good for business users, programmers, lovers, and school students.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Get more info on official website: http://friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There is a new Raspberry Pi opponent that is quite cheap. Believe it or not, a number of people may consider it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an certainly excellent design and layout, along with crucial built-in features such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

RaspberryPi: Compute Module and Module I/O – First look



A real first look at the new Raspberry Pi Module and Module I/O (don’t call them model C). I had to print these out to chat about them. I think this is really big news from Raspberry Pi, even though mainstream media – and mainstream tech media – doesn’t seem to be paying much attention at the moment.

Here’s the info from the Raspberry Pi Website:
http://www.raspberrypi.org/raspberry-pi-compute-module-new-product/

Here’s the official Raspberry Pi video:

Buy a compute module here: http://amzn.to/1B9wDya
Buy the Raspberry Pi 2B: http://amzn.to/1zJlP9L

—-
Check out my other Raspberry Pi comparisons:
Made in the UK vs Made in China: http://youtu.be/qP4qoVnhAEY
Raspberry Pi vs Chromecast: http://youtu.be/TRJY3AOqVHw
Raspberry Pi Model A vs Model B: http://youtu.be/mty2xC9TDKY

To see my other Raspberry Pi projects:
Outdoor Automated Lights: http://youtu.be/xc1daIb1LVc
Garage door remote: http://youtu.be/p2abZ90-eU0
File Server (NAS): http://youtu.be/fGYCrYT114o
Weather Station: http://youtu.be/dRT39e3PQrk
Raspberry Pi Bitcoin miner: http://youtu.be/U2_tFci61PE

Donate here: If you like the video or think it’s useful buy me a coffee http://bit.ly/1kAous6

Donate with bitcoin! 1HfHr25qZQjPzwphPxpNaD5CytDNYcfzrJ

Support this channel on Patreon!
http://patreon.com/skiwithpete source

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) aims to electronic devices

Sort of announced in July 2016, the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) is considered to go to the market soon. Last Oct . computer equipment maker NEC previously announced a new array of professional P and V Series large format displays that flawlessly include the RPi CM3 module. The new module, available in 2 variants – CM3 and CM3L (lite) – will complement the CM1 module introduced a few years ago.

Specifications for the CM1, CM3 and CM3L SODIMM modules can be found in the data sheet found on the RPi web-site
https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/computemodule/RPI-CM-DATASHEET-V1_0.pdf
. Where the CM1 was powered by a BCM2835 chip (as used on the original RPi and RPi B+ models), the CM3 consists of a quad core 1.2 GHz BCM2837 chip, like the RPi 3. It includes 1 GB of LPDDR2 RAM and 4 GB eMMC Flash. The ‘L’ version is a CM3 devoid of eMMC Flash, enabling the individual to hook up his/her individual SD/eMMC device. The pinout of the CM1 and CM3 modules are the same but the CM3 module is one millimeter higher (31 mm).

Cost

The cost of the new modules isn’t known yet, but because a CM1 sells at approximately £20, a matching price could very well be expected for the CM3.

Dependent on : https://www.elektormagazine.com/news/raspberry-pi-compute-module-3-cm3-to-hit-the-market-soon

Technical Specs

The CM3 is founded upon the Raspberry Pi 3 hardware and is for the purpose of industrial use in order to offer a less expensive solution for customers to make customized products based on the Pi hardware and software platform. The Compute Module series is scaled-down and has less abilities and ports than a regular Raspberry Pi, allowing it to be suitable for Internet of Things (IoT) products.

“The module makes use of a standard DDR2 SODIMM form factor, sockets for which are made by several manufacturers, are very easily obtainable, and additionally are low-cost,” Raspberry Pi COO and hardware lead James Adams claimed in a post.

You will find 2 options of the CM3. Listed here are the technical specs for both:

Standard Version:

BCM2837 chip at up to 1.2Gigahertz
1GB RAM
4GB of on-module eMMC flash

Lite Variant:

BCM2837 processor at up to 1.2GHz
1GB RAM
SD card interface on Module pins which means that a user can wire it up to an eMMC or SD card that they select

Both versions can be slotted into a newly released Compute Module IO Board V3 (CMIO3) which lets you do the following:

Delivers required power to the CM3
Permits you to program the CM3 Standard’s flash memory or to make use of an SD card on the Lite version.
Connect to the processor interfaces in a a little more friendly fashion (pin headers and flexi connectors, much like the Pi)
Offers the necessary HDMI and USB connectors to ensure that you have an complete system which can boot Raspbian (or the OS of your preference).

“This board delivers both a starting template for those who want to design with the Compute Module, and a faster way to begin with tinkering with the hardware, and building and testing a system, before going to the cost of fabricating a custom made board,” Adam said.

The older Compute Module model will continue to be made available, for individuals that have no need for the CM3’s performance enhancement. As per the Raspberry Pi official magazine The MagPi:

“With a couple of caveats, the CM3 can be utilized a drop-in substitute for the CM1 since they are pin compatible; the CM3 is 1mm taller, however, while the CPU can pull considerably more current from the VBAT power supply line and will deliver a great deal more heat under heavy load.”

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