This video demonstrates how to attach a breadboard to a Raspberry Pi 3 with optional touchscreen. LED lights are then installed on the breadboard and turned on/off via the WiringPi software.

Hardware tips:
* Disconnect power to your Raspberry Pi before attempting this tutorial.
* Do not connect LEDs directly to the breadboard rows that are already in use by the T cobbler. Use the lower rows that are free.
* The positive pin (longer leg) of the LED connects in the same numbered row (different letter) as the jumper wire.
* The negative pin (shorter leg) of the LED connects in the same numbered row (different letter) as one end of the resistor.
* The other end of the resistor connects in the negative column on the edge of the breadboard (any row).
* The other end of the jumper wire connects in the same row (any lettered column) as the desired GPIO pin as indicated on the T cobbler.

Example pins:
Connect LED 1 positive leg to breadboard row 30, column E
Connect LED 1 negative leg to breadboard row 29, column E
Connect LED 2 positive leg to breadboard row 28, column E
Connect LED 2 negative leg to breadboard row 27, column E
Connect LED 3 positive leg to breadboard row 26, column E
Connect LED 3 negative leg to breadboard row 25, column E
Connect Resistor 1 leg 1 to breadboard row 29, column C
Connect Resistor 1 leg 2 to breadboard 3V negative column, any unused row
Connect Resistor 2 leg 1 to breadboard row 27, column C
Connect Resistor 2 leg 2 to breadboard 3V negative column, any unused row
Connect Resistor 3 leg 1 to breadboard row 25, column C
Connect Resistor 3 leg 2 to breadboard 3V negative column, any unused row
Connect Jumper 1 end 1 to breadboard row 30, column A
Connect Jumper 1 end 2 to the breadboard row that aligns with GPIO 17 (pin 11) on the T cobbler, column C
Connect Jumper 2 end 1 to breadboard row 28, column A
Connect Jumper 1 end 2 to the breadboard row that aligns with GPIO 27 (pin 13) on the T cobbler, column C
Connect Jumper 3 end 1 to breadboard row 26, column A
Connect Jumper 1 end 2 to the breadboard row that aligns with GPIO 22 (pin 15) on the T cobbler, column C

To install WiringPi, follow the instructions at http://wiringpi.com/download-and-install/

To change the orientation of the Raspberry Pi Touchscreen and to flip it upside down, add the following line to /boot/config.txt:

lcd_rotate=2

The commands to control the LEDs are as follows.

To set the pins to Output mode:
gpio -g mode 17 out
gpio -g mode 27 out
gpio -g mode 22 out

To turn the LEDs on:
gpio -g write 17 1
gpio -g write 27 1
gpio -g write 22 1

To turn the LEDs off:
gpio -g write 17 0
gpio -g write 27 0
gpio -g write 22 0

Note: the ending 2 in the “gpio -g write 22 2” command in the video is a typo.

Check http://blog.brianguy.com for additional notes.
Follow @brianguy_cloud on Twitter.

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Raspberry Pi Alternate Options: Why They’re a Better Buy

Raspberry Pi is not the baddest small PC throughout the world, and it’s what its contenders are seeking to tell the remaining of the world. Now and then, a new mini computer is released on the market promising to be the largest one to overcome Raspberry Pi. The reality is, there’s a new Raspberry Pi killer known as NanoPi M1 Plus, which is Ubuntu-Linux ready and is priced at $30.

The Raspberry Pi is launched with four variations in recent years. These comprise of Raspberry Pi Model B+, Pi 2 Model B, Zero, and the most current which is Pi 3 Model B.

Pi 3 was established to make sure Raspberry Pi has the ability to meet anybody with a low cost PC for programming. It’s improved CPU with the Cortex A53, Hackaday mentioned, and runs on 1.2 GHz. At $35, the Raspberry Pi is the most sought-after of all.

The Raspberry Pi, but bear in mind, is not the single single board computer(SBC) for homebrewed projects. There are many more out there which are less expensive, and then some that can do more than Raspberry Pi for a bit more, ZD Net noted.

Firstly, there’s the Omega 2, which has a modular nature empowering software engineers to add Bluetooth or Gps unit without problems. It has constructed in Wi-Fi and flash storage space; the Operating-system is Linux distro on top of the OpenWrt system. The Omega 2 is priced at $5 and can even run on FreeBSD Operating-system, which explains why it is good for college students.

The BBC Micro:bit is priced at $16 and is suitable for learners for their learning and prototyping projects. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor drives it from inside and it is different from the remainder as a result of 5×5 LED matrix. This benefit offers 25 independently programmable red-colored LEDs for basic output.

In addition, there is the BeagleBone Black, which is priced at $55 and just like the Raspberry Pi, is yet another community-supported platform both for hobbyists and programmers. It really works super fast; it could boost Linux in under 10-seconds and can develop in within 5 min’s. It’s driven by AM335x 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 coupled with 512MB DDR3 RAM.

Someone else is the NanoPi M1 Plus, that has been known as as the new Raspberry Pi killer. At $30, it promises to have a more robust layout and design and was capable to put in beneficial attributes like Wi-Fi and Wireless BT. Further, it includes an IR receiver, mic, 8GB storage space, and power and reset switches.

Nevertheless, the best attribute of NanoPi M1 Plus is its power to run Ubuntu-Mate, Ubuntu-Core, and also Debian, Beta News mentioned. It is made for firm users, developers, collectors, and learners.

nanopi m1 plus specs

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus – a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Find out more on official site: http://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=176

There’s a new Raspberry Pi rival that is quite economical. Actually, a lot of people might see it as a Pi killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an certainly superior layout and design, and valuable incorporated features including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer