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Category: Asterisk Raspberry Pi (page 2 of 5)

Asterisk Raspberry Pi, How-tos

Froscon 2013 – 2013 08 24 – raspberry pi meets asterisk and php – jan kammerath – froscon.de



Website : http://www.froscon.de.

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Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, plus more

In this week’s Top Five, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your individual DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five programming languages for DevOps.

5 article content of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be the best for web design?
3. How to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Easy methods to set up Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read on about the 1st formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in conjunction with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released a month later, and after that I have been playing around with the a variety of Fedora spins intended for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a group of hints, screenshots, as well as my own personal thoughts on the 1st formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Making Inbound & Outbound call using Asterisk PBX and USB 3G Dongle



Watch a demo video of making inbound and outbound call using Asterisk PBX, Raspberry PI, FreePBX and USB 3G Dongle. I am also selling the USB 8G Card installed with Asterisk 11.0, FreePBX 2.11, Chan Dongle, USB 3G modem Huawei E1550 and sample dialplan that used in this video. Please contact me if you are interested and thanks for watching.

I have also selling the kit in Ebay:
http://www.ebay.com.sg/itm/Asterisk-PBX-Raspberry-Pi-8GB-SD-Card-/111079053572?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_216&hash=item19dcd3d904

source

5 Best: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

When it comes to this week’s Top Five, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, contrasting Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five programming languages for DevOps.

5 content pieces of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be ideal for web development?
3. How one can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your private DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The right way to install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the 1st officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, along with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released 1 month later, and since that time I have been experimenting with the a variety of Fedora spins intended for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular blog post is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a number of tips, screenshots, and also my own personal ideas on the first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Asterisk en la Raspberry PI — ASTPI



Tras 3 horas de compilación la versión 1.8.11-cert5 de Asterisk corre por primera vez en la RaspBerry Pi

source

5 Most Beneficial: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

When considering this week’s Top Five, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your special DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, contrasting Python and Ruby for website design, and the top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial posts of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be ideal for website design?
3. How you can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Establish your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Tips on how to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the 1st officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in addition to initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released a month later, and since then I have been experimenting with the a number of Fedora spins available for the newest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular blog post is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a range of suggestions, screenshots, and also my personal ideas on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

raspberry domotica asterisk inim grandstream



sistema telefonico asterisk su raspberry integrato con antintrusione inim e videosorveglianza grandstream possibilità di chiamata postazione citofonica tradizionale con interfaccia citotelefonica o targa già telefonica(elvox ,2N,tema) con streaming da telecamera grand stream posizionata sull ingresso.

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, even more

With regard to this week’s Top Five, we showcase putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own private DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for web design, and the top 5 development languages for DevOps.

5 blog posts of the week

5. Top 5 development languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be ideal for web design?
3. The right way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build your own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How one can install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Maintain reading about the first officially supported release of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the launch of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, as well as initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 premiered a month later, and ever since then I have been playing around with the all sorts of Fedora spins designed for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a bunch of advice, screenshots, and my own personal ideas on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

projeto raspberry py



Raspberry pi Automação & Asterisk

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

When considering this week’s Top 5, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, evaluating Python and Ruby for web design, and the top five development languages for DevOps.

5 Best blog posts of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which is the best for web design?
3. The way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Construct your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Tips on how to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the very first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in addition to initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was introduced one month later, and subsequently I have been playing around with the several different Fedora spins available for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a bunch of hints, screenshots, as well as my own individual thoughts on the first formally supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Build your very own Raspberry Pi Mumble Server



Learn to build a Raspberry Pi Mumble Server in this easy to follow video tutorial. If you’re wondering what a Mumble server is then it is an open source VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) software that allows you to enjoy a low latency but high quality chat.

Full Project here: http://pimylifeup.com/raspberry-pi-mumble-server/

Throughout this tutorial I use a few command lines that you might have trouble making out on screen if so please find them in the order I use them below:

sudo apt-get install mumble-server
sudo dpkg-reconfigure mumble-server
ip addr show
sudo nano /etc/mumble-server.ini
sudo /etc/init.d/mumble-server restart

Installing the mumble server on raspberry pi is a pretty straight forward process and you shouldn’t run into many problems. If you do tho check out my website as it contains a more detailed explanation on installing mumble and you can also comment asking for help!

This is not the only Raspberry Pi VOIP solution there are others such as Asterisk that offers a more complete package such as inbound and outbound calls and much more.

I hope this guide on how to build a Raspberry Pi mumble server has helped you! If you like my projects and would like to see more then you should subscribe so you’re kept up to date with the latest from Pi My Life Up.

source

5 Most Beneficial: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

With regard to this week’s Top Five, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your special DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for website development, and the top five computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Top content of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be perfect for website development?
3. Methods to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How one can deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Stay with me about the first officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched one month later, and subsequently I have been playing around with the a variety of different Fedora spins obtainable for the most up-to-date versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a bunch of suggestions, screenshots, and also my own individual ideas on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Domótica e comunicações com Raspberry pi 3 – II



Domótica e comunicações com Raspberry, arduino e asterisk.

source

5 Best: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and others

In this week’s Top 5, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial articles of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be best for web development?
3. How you can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Make your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best way to install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Continue reading about the 1st officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 premiered four weeks later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the all sorts of Fedora spins obtainable for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This informative article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a range of recommendations, screenshots, and also my personal thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Broadband-Hamnet MESH network working with Asterisk



Running a Broadband-Hamnet ( BBHN ) MESH network at home, I have connected a Cisco SPA525G SIP enabled VoIP phone to a Raspberry Pi running the RasPBX Asterisk software. Then, using a WiFi hotspot connected to the MESH network, I am able to connect my Android Nexus 5 phone and make a VoIP call to it. This project is designed to help the broadband-hamnet community in creating solutions for emergency and disaster preparedness, and separate ham networks. Filmed via YouTube Capture

source

Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

With regard to this week’s Top Five, we emphasize putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your personal DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over internet protocol) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five coding languages for DevOps.

5 Best content pieces of the week

5. Top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be the best for web development?
3. The best way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Construct your very own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

How one can install Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the very first officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, as well as initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The final “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was introduced four weeks later, and subsequently I have been experimenting with the an assortment of Fedora spins available for the most recent versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a collection of advice, screenshots, and also my personal thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Raspberry Pi GPIO con Asterisk



Habilitando una salida digital de la Raspberry Pi usando Asterisk

source

5 Best: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

On the subject of this week’s Top Five, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your individual DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top 5 computer programming languages for DevOps.

5 Most Beneficial content of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be ideal for website design?
3. The way to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Construct your own DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on https://opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

The best way to mount Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Maintain reading about the very first officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In October 2016, the release of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, in conjunction with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was released one month later, and ever since then I have been experimenting with the all sorts of Fedora spins out there for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This particular blog post is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a bunch of tricks, screenshots, as well as my personal thoughts on the first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on https://opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

Proyecto VoIP Asterisk



Servidor de telefonía VoIP con Raspberry Pi B+

Se redirigen las conexiones del router hacia la Raspberry y esta a su
vez enruta el tráfico hacia el terminal Android que tiene una tarjeta sim de datos 3G.

Realizando llamadas externas a través de Internet mediante una Raspberry y Android como HotSpot

jesusamoros@hotmail.com

source

Top Five: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, etc

When considering this week’s Top Five, we focus on putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your very own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, assessing Python and Ruby for website design, and the top five development languages for DevOps.

5 Best pieces of the week

5. Top 5 coding languages for DevOps
4. Python vs. Ruby: Which can be best for website design?
3. How you can install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi
2. Build up your individual DNS name server on Linux
1. Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

See more details on opensource.com/article/17/4/top-5-april-14

Tips on how to deploy Fedora 25 on your Raspberry Pi

Read more about the first officially supported edition of Fedora for the Pi.
In Oct . 2016, the introduction of Fedora 25 Beta was announced, coupled with initial support for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The last “general availability” version of Fedora 25 was launched one month later, and ever since then I have been playing around with the several different Fedora spins available for the latest versions of the Raspberry Pi.

This article is not as much a review of Fedora 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a bunch of suggestions, screenshots, and also my own individual thoughts on the very first officially supported version of Fedora for the Pi.

See details on opensource.com/article/17/3/how-install-fedora-on-raspberry-pi

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